Apple

Apple quietly hires renowned iPhone security expert

A new Rose Gold iPhone 7 Plus with dual cameras is shown in Australian's flagship Apple store in Sydney, September 16, 2016 as the iPhone 7 range goes on sale for the first time. (REUTERS/Jason Reed)

A new Rose Gold iPhone 7 Plus with dual cameras is shown in Australian's flagship Apple store in Sydney, September 16, 2016 as the iPhone 7 range goes on sale for the first time. (REUTERS/Jason Reed)

In a blog post today, famous iPhone security expert Jonathan Zdziarski announced that he's going to work for Apple. It's an unusual announcement for a number of reasons -- firstly, people don't normally know or care who's working on Apple's security team -- but Zdziarski is a little different.

Zdziarski is a prominent security consultant who's also been a thorn in Apple's side for years. Most notably, he's called out Apple for shipping a version of iOS without an encrypted kernel, pulled apart Facebook's iOS code to reveal " malware-like" code, and been a vital source of information during Apple's short war with the FBI.

In his blog post, Zdziarski briefly summarized his reasons for the move:

I'm pleased to announce that I've accepted a position with Apple's Security Engineering and Architecture team, and am very excited to be working with a group of like minded individuals so passionate about protecting the security and privacy of others.

This decision marks the conclusion of what I feel has been a matter of conscience for me over time. Privacy is sacred; our digital lives can reveal so much about us -- our interests, our deepest thoughts, and even who we love. I am thrilled to be working with such an exceptional group of people who share a passion to protect that.

Zdziarski has long been an advocate for customer privacy and strong encryption. Apple's hiring move is likely just a coincidence, a case of a company picking up a talented employee where possible. But in the current climate, going and finding a security engineer who is also well known for his ethical stance on hacking certainly sounds like a message.

This story originally appeared on BGR.