Theodore Roosevelt statue at Museum of Natural History defaced with red liquid

A red liquid was splashed on the base of the Theodore Roosevelt statue outside the American Museum of National History in New York City early Thursday morning, police said, continuing a trend of vandalism of statues deemed offensive by certain groups.

The paint spray was discovered around 7:15 a.m. Thursday morning, said police, who believe the incident occurred sometime after 4 a.m. No words were written with the paint.

Erected in 1938, the 10-foot-tall statue depicts the nation’s 26th president on horseback, flanked by an indigenous man and an African-American man.

Erected in 1938, the 10-foot-tall statue depicts 26th President Theodore Roosevelt on horseback flanked by an indigenous man and an African-American man.

Erected in 1938, the 10-foot-tall statue depicts President Theodore Roosevelt on horseback.  (Patrick Manning/Fox News)

The statue, which sits on the steps leading up to the museum, has been a focal point of Columbus Day protests for several years. Activists claim it depicts racism, and white supremacy over other cultures.

“This is not a way to advance this conversation,” Anne Canty, a spokesperson for the museum told Fox News. “The mayor has opened [a] panel, looking at the question of statues. We refer people to that.”

Workers with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation clean up the Theodore Roosevelt statue outside the American Natural History Museum in New York City.

Workers with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation clean up the Theodore Roosevelt statue.  (Patrick Manning/Fox News)

No suspect has been identified and police said the investigation is ongoing. The city’s parks department said a crew has been sent to clean up the liquid.

The incident comes weeks after a similar liquid was splashed on a Christopher Columbus statue several blocks away.

“Hate will not be tolerated,” the unidentified vandal wrote on the Columbus statue along with “#somthingscoming.”

Fox News’ Patrick Manning contributed to this report.