RELIGION

Muslims see anti-mosque bias in landmarking decision

  • A house in Yonkers, N.Y. that the Islamic Community Center of Mid-Weschester hopes to convert into a mosque is seen on Monday, June 6, 2016. The Islamic Community Center  faces hurdles now that the home they purchased has been given a historic landmark designation limiting how it can be altered. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    A house in Yonkers, N.Y. that the Islamic Community Center of Mid-Weschester hopes to convert into a mosque is seen on Monday, June 6, 2016. The Islamic Community Center faces hurdles now that the home they purchased has been given a historic landmark designation limiting how it can be altered. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)  (The Associated Press)

  • Arshad Shariff, chairman of the Islamic Community Center of Mid-Weschester, speaks to a reporter in the house the group hopes to convert into a mosque in Yonkers, N.Y., Monday, June 6, 2016. The Islamic Community Center  faces hurdles now that the home they purchased has been given a historic landmark designation limiting how it can be altered. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Arshad Shariff, chairman of the Islamic Community Center of Mid-Weschester, speaks to a reporter in the house the group hopes to convert into a mosque in Yonkers, N.Y., Monday, June 6, 2016. The Islamic Community Center faces hurdles now that the home they purchased has been given a historic landmark designation limiting how it can be altered. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)  (The Associated Press)

  • Holes are seen in the ceiling near stained glass windows at a house in Yonkers, N.Y. that the Islamic Community Center of Mid-Weschester hopes to convert into a mosque on Monday, June 6, 2016.  The Islamic Community Center  faces hurdles now that the home they purchased has been given a historic landmark designation limiting how it can be altered. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Holes are seen in the ceiling near stained glass windows at a house in Yonkers, N.Y. that the Islamic Community Center of Mid-Weschester hopes to convert into a mosque on Monday, June 6, 2016. The Islamic Community Center faces hurdles now that the home they purchased has been given a historic landmark designation limiting how it can be altered. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)  (The Associated Press)

A Muslim group in suburban New York says a decision to give landmark status to a house it had planned to use as a mosque is less about historical preservation and more about putting up barriers to their plans.

The Islamic Community Center of Mid-Westchester bought the home in Yonkers early last year. A neighborhood group filed an application months later to have the building landmarked. The group got the final greenlight from city officials late last month.

Yonkers Mayor Mike Spano insisted the landmark status wouldn't prevent the home from being used as a mosque.

Muslims around the country say they have faced all kinds of zoning and other obstacles, stemming from anti-Muslim feeling, as they've tried to build or expand mosques.