The Donald Trump campaign and Washington Republicans are calling on Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to have all of her daily schedules as secretary of state released before Election Day, after the State Department said Friday it cannot comply with the court-ordered release until after voting.

The Associated Press reported earlier this week, after analyzing schedules released so far, that more than half the people outside the government who met or spoke by telephone with Clinton while she was secretary of state had given money -- either personally or through companies or groups -- to the Clinton Foundation.

“It is unacceptable that the State Department is now refusing to release her official schedule before the election in full,” Trump campaign spokesman Jason Miller said after the agency told AP lawyers late Friday that the last of the detailed schedules won’t be release until around Dec. 30.

“Voters deserve to know the truth before they cast their ballots,” Miller continued. “Hillary Clinton should immediately demand that these public records be released before voting begins.”

The State Department has so far released about half of the schedules -- seven months after a federal judge ordered the agency to begin releasing monthly batches of Clinton’s detailed daily schedules, which show with whom she had meetings.

Revelation about the foundation’s fundraising and allegations of a so-called “pay-to-play” operation, along with Clinton’s use of a private server system while secretary of state for official emails, have raised question among voters about her trustworthiness and transparency.

 

"Hillary Clinton needs to end the stonewalling and either call for their release or release them herself," Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus said Friday in a statement. "Failure to exercise transparency will just further prove she isn't concerned with telling voters the truth about her unethical behavior, a pattern that will continue if she is elected president."

The AP's analysis, released earlier this week, focused on people with private interests and excluded her meetings or calls with U.S. federal employees or foreign government representatives.

The wire service’s reporting was based on official calendars covering Clinton's entire term plus the more-detailed daily schedules covering roughly half her time as secretary of state. The AP first asked for Clinton's calendars in 2010 and again in 2013. It then sued the State Department in federal court to obtain the detailed schedules, and the department so far has provided about half of them under court order.

Clinton has said the AP's analysis was flawed because it did not account fully for all meetings and phone calls during her entire term as secretary. She also said the analysis should have included meetings with federal employees and foreign diplomats. The AP said it focused on her meetings with outsiders because those were more discretionary, as Clinton would normally meet with federal officials and foreign officials as part of her job.

Clinton said she met with people outside government regardless of whether they gave money or charitable commitments to her family's charity.

"These are people I would be proud to meet with, as any secretary of state would have been proud to meet with, to hear about their work and their insights," Clinton said this week on CNN.

With the foundation drawing continued attention, Clinton promised Friday to put in place additional safeguards to prevent conflicts of interest with the charity should she win the White House.

The foundation issue, along with continued focus on her use of a private email server, has dogged Clinton politically throughout the week, drawing strong criticism from opponent Donald Trump.

Former President Bill Clinton said last week that if she is elected president, the foundation will no longer accept foreign or corporate donations.

The State Department is now estimating there are about 2,700 pages of schedules left. Under its process, it is reviewing and censoring them page-by-page to remove personal details such as private phone numbers or email addresses. In some cases it has censored names of people who met privately with Clinton or the subjects they discussed.

A State Department spokeswoman, Elizabeth Trudeau, declined to discuss the ongoing case and noted the agency is struggling with thousands of public records requests.

In court, the AP in December had asked U.S. District Judge Richard Leon to order the State Department to produce specific percentages of the remaining schedules every 30 days under a formula so that all would be released before the presidential primary elections were complete.

Instead, because the State Department said it did not know how many pages were left, Leon ordered it in January to release at least 600 pages of schedules every 30 days. Each 600-page group covers about three months of Clinton's tenure.

Under the present rate, a government attorney working on behalf of the State Department notified the AP's lawyers, it will take about four and one-half months -- or until Dec. 30 -- to release all the remaining schedules through the end of Clinton's term, in February 2013. The government's notice late Thursday was the first time the State Department has provided the AP with a measure of how many pages were remaining and when it expected to complete the job.

It was unclear whether the judge will reconsider his earlier decision and order faster results. In the AP's lawsuit over other Clinton-related files, Leon has said it would be "ridiculous" to allow the State Department to delay until even weeks before the election. He also cited "mounting frustration that this is a project where the State Department may be running out the clock."

The Associate Press contributed to  this report.