The Duggar drama may not be over. According to a report in In Touch magazine, the non-family molestation victim of Josh Duggar is reportedly preparing to file a civil suit against him.

Legal experts told FOX411 that despite the statute of limitations for criminal charges having run out, the victim may have the right to file a civil suit against the former reality star in Arkansas.

"Once a child reaches the age of majority, which is 18, the statute of limitations [to sue] has run," Arkansas attorney Robert Cossio told FOX411. However, Cossio explained that according to Arkansas code annotated section 16-56-130, should a victim only begin to experience the effects of the sexual abuse at a later date, a judge can grant them the right to sue civilly from the date the effects begin.

"It's up to the judge to determine if the statute of limitations is tolling or not," Cossio said. "Then she would have three years from the time of discovery to sue. Let's say she dealt with [the abuse] back then but now that all of this has come to light, and she's just starting to feel the ramifications of the sexual abuse" she would be allowed to bring suit.

"You can sue the parents of Josh Duggar for negligent supervision," New York-based lawyer Eric Subin told FOX411. Subin also explained that as the statute of limitations on criminal claims have run, Josh Duggar "runs no risk for going to jail" or "being prosecuted in court for any criminal violations" so he cannot call upon the Fifth Amendment.

That means the Duggar family could be required to answer every question asked of them surrounding the incidents.

A June report by In Touch claimed the Duggar family was being investigated as recently as May 27, and a 911 call regarding the Duggars was placed on that date by a Washington County Department of Human Services (DHS) worker because the DHS was allegedly being denied access to a minor in the family.

The call was supposedly just days after a May 19 report by the magazine revealed Josh Duggar had sexually abused five females – including four sisters -- when he was 14 or 15 back in 2002 and 2003. Josh Duggar, his parents, and two of his sisters—Jessa Seewald and Jill Dillard—have since spoken openly about the abuse.

After the revelations about the Duggars hit the web, the Arkansas Department of Human Services reportedly launched a new investigation into the family made famous by the TV show “19 Kids and Counting.”

The Washington County DHS directed FOX411 to the Arkansas DHS, who told us, “In Arkansas all child maltreatment investigations are confidential by law.” The department could neither confirm nor deny if the Duggars were being investigated or had been investigated recently.

A rep for the Duggar family did not return FOX411’s request for comment. TLC declined to comment and gave no update on the fate of "19 Kids and Counting."

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