Filmmaker Michael Bay has apologized for footage of a deadly B-52 plane crash being used in a film he produced, and requested it be removed from all promotional materials. But as of Thursday morning, the footage can still be seen on the movie's YouTube trailer.

The movie “Project Almanac” has a scene where characters are watching a plane crash on their laptop. That footage is of an actual accident that killed four Air Force officers in 1994, the Air Force Times reports.

The families of two of the victims — Col. Robert Wolff and Lt. Col. Mark McGeehan — were reportedly upset after seeing the crash footage on a trailer for the movie.

Bay, who did not direct the film, said he did not realize the footage was real, and thought it was a visual effect when he screened the movie. He said the footage should be removed from the film and all promotional material, and apologized to the families of the crash victims.

"I let film directors make their movies at Platinum Dunes [Bay's production company] and give them tremendous responsibilities," Bay said in a statement. "Well, unfortunately a very bad choice was made to use a real crash instead of creating a VFX shot, without realizing the impact it could have on the families."

"I have asked Paramount Pictures to remove this shot immediately from the picture," Bay said. "I want to also extend my deepest apology to the families, and also to the U.S. Air Force."

A rep for Paramount first told told the Air Force Times the footage in the trailer was of a 2009 Tokyo crash, but were told by the families a second trailer contained the B-52 footage. 

The studio said they would remove the offending footage, but as of Thursday, it still remained (the trailer is below).

Col. Wolff's daughter, Whitney Wolff Thompson, said she accepted Bay's apology.

"I appreciate your willingness to admit that this was indeed a real plane crash, and that a mistake was made in choosing to use it,” she said.