Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi says former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan and a commission he is leading to resolve religious conflict in the country's west will help heal the wounds of her people, though the most powerful political party in the region refused to meet with the panel.

The Southeast Asian country set up the commission last month to help find solutions to "protracted issues" in Rakhine state, where human rights groups have documented widespread abuses against minority Rohingya Muslims.

Annan and the commission on Tuesday begin a six-day Rakhine trip during which they will see the camps and meet members of political and religious groups.

But Rakhine's largest party says it will not work with the commission. Its secretary says it doesn't want a "foreigner's human rights perspectives."