Airlines

Passenger goes into labor during flight, names baby after airline

A mother celebrated the birth of her healthy newborn aboard a Jetstar Asia plane by naming her baby after the airline.

A mother celebrated the birth of her healthy newborn aboard a Jetstar Asia plane by naming her baby after the airline.  (Jetstar Asia)

Expectant mothers are usually warned of the risks they take on while traveling.

But sometimes when a baby’s ready to come, all you can do is push.

Last Friday, a pregnant woman began going into labor at 30,000 feet on a JetStar Asia flight from Singapore to Yangon, Myanmar. 

According to a Facebook post from the airline, the Jetstar crew on board the flight, led by Customer Service Manager Saw Ler Htu, rushed into action, calling for immediate medical assistance. There were three doctors aboard the aircraft who assisted crew with the speedy delivery.

A baby boy clocking in at six pounds, seven ounces, was born just before the plane touched down in Myanmar. The mother and child were rushed to a local hospital upon arrival but have since been discharged.

“The happy arrival of baby Jet Star was met with a round of applause from other passengers on the plane, so we’re sure it’s not a moment they’ll ever forget either,” a Jetstar spokesperson told news.com.au.

But it wasn’t just the passengers who were thrilled by experience.

The new mother was reportedly so overwhelmed by the support and care she received during the ordeal that she named her newborn after the airline—Saw Jet Star.

The airline, a budget carrier based in Singapore, says it’s the first baby ever born on one of its aircrafts and is providing the family with SGD $1,000 (about USD $741) to put toward supplies needed for the newborn. The doctors who assisted with the delivery were also rewarded with Jetstar flight vouchers.

U.S. airlines have varying rules regarding pregnant fliers. Jetstar has not released details about how far along the mother claimed to be but for a flight less than four hours, the airline permits pregnant women to travel up to the end of their 40th week, provided they bring a doctor’s note.