Hillary Clinton breaks silence on Harvey Weinstein: 'I was shocked and appalled'

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday broke her silence on the sexual misconduct allegations against Hollywood producer and Democratic donor Harvey Weinstein, saying such behavior "cannot be tolerated.”

“I was shocked and appalled by the revelations about Harvey Weinstein,” the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee said in a statement, released on Twitter by spokesman Nick Merrill. “The behavior described by women coming forward cannot be tolerated. Their courage and the support of others is critical in helping to stop this kind of behavior.” 

Weinstein was a fixture among Democratic supporters and close to party luminaries for decades, making the allegations especially embarrassing for a party that touts itself as pushing progressive policies for women.

Last week, The New York Times reported that Weinstein had settled sexual harassment lawsuits with at least eight women. More allegations emerged Tuesday in The New Yorker. 

But until now, Clinton had remained silent about Weinstein, a friend who had donated thousands to her political campaigns over the years, even as some Democratic lawmakers said they would return or give Weinstein donations to charity. 

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Weinstein contributed $46,350 to Clinton during her presidential candidacy, as well as to HILLPAC, a committee Clinton used to support other Democrats while she was a senator, according to The Associated Press.

Weinstein also has made massive donations to the Clinton Foundation. The foundation says on its official website that Weinstein gave in the range of $100,001 to $250,000 through June 2017.

“Where’s Hillary Clinton? Where’s she standing on this issue? She’s been silent. Her silence is deafening,” Republican National Committee chairman Ronna McDaniel said Monday on CNN.

Weinstein and his family have given more than $1.4 million in political contributions since the 1992 election cycle, virtually all of it to Democratic lawmakers, candidates and their allies, according to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.