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Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of World Wide Web, calls for digital bill of rights

Inventor of Web Tim Berners Lee.jpg

Tim Berners-Lee, the British inventor of the World Wide Web, in a screenshot from a video made on the 25th anniversary of his invention. (FoxNews.com / Vimeo)

Tim Berners-Lee, the British inventor of the World Wide Web has endorsed a digital bill of rights to protect Internet users from surveillance.

Speaking on the 25th anniversary of his creation, Tim Berners-Lee says he hopes to spark a global conversation about the need to defend principles that have made the Web successful.

"Twenty-five years ago today, I filed the proposal for what was to become the World Wide Web. My boss dubbed it ‘vague but exciting.’ Luckily, he thought enough of the idea to allow me to quietly work on it on the side," Berners-Lee wrote on the anniversary of his invention.

He told the Guardian newspaper that the Web was under increasing attack by governments and corporate interests. He said the system needed an online Magna Carta, or foundation of rules, to protect its openness and neutrality.

Berners-Lee said in a statement Wednesday he believes the Web should be "accessible to all, from any device, and one that empowers all of us to achieve our dignity, rights and potential as humans."

"Today, and throughout this year, we should celebrate the Web’s first 25 years. But though the mood is upbeat, we also know we are not done. We have much to do for the Web to reach its full potential. We must continue to defend its core principles and tackle some key challenges."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.