Obesity

FDA approves stomach-draining obesity treatment

This rendering provided by Aspire Bariatrics, Inc. demonstrates the use of the AspireAssist weight loss device, approved by the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday, June 14, 2016.  The AspireAssist system consists of a thin tube implanted in the stomach, connecting to an outside port on the skin of the belly, which itself is connected to an external device, which helps remove nearly a third of the food stored in the stomach before calories are absorbed into the body, causing weight loss. (Aspire Bariatrics, Inc. via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

This rendering provided by Aspire Bariatrics, Inc. demonstrates the use of the AspireAssist weight loss device, approved by the Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday, June 14, 2016. The AspireAssist system consists of a thin tube implanted in the stomach, connecting to an outside port on the skin of the belly, which itself is connected to an external device, which helps remove nearly a third of the food stored in the stomach before calories are absorbed into the body, causing weight loss. (Aspire Bariatrics, Inc. via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT  (Aspire Bariatrics, Inc.)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A new weight loss device offers a novel approach to cutting calories: draining them from the stomach before they are digested.

The AspireAssist system consists of a thin tube implanted in the stomach, connecting to an outside port on the skin of the belly. About 30 minutes after finishing a meal, users connect the port to an external device, which drains some of the recently-consumed food into the toilet.

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The manufacturer says its system removes about 30 percent of food stored in the stomach before it begins causing weight gain.

It's the latest in a series of new options for millions of obese Americans who have been unable to lose weight via more traditional methods. About 38 percent of all U.S. adults are obese.