The Americas

Poop bombs: Venezuelans’ new weapon against riot police are ‘poopootov cocktails’

Demonstrators in Venezuela, now on their sixth week of protests against the socialist government of Nicolas Maduro, have reportedly started responding to police’s tear gas attacks with so-called “poopootov cocktails” — yep, glass bottles containing human excrement mixed with water.

According to El Pais, the fetid bombs made their debut over the weekend during clashes in the city of Los Teques, a few miles from Caracas.

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In the confrontation, according to the story that quickly became viral, a group of officers of the National Guard – militarized police – was the target of a feces attack and many were seen vomiting as they took cover.

On Monday, El Pais reported, this type of “bombs” were used in the cities of San Cristóbal, Merida, Valencia and Caracas.

Paint bombs have also become popular among demonstrators, who throw them at anti-riot vehicles to block the driver's visibility.

The clashes come as Venezuelans suffer from severe food shortages, triple-digit inflation and high crime.

The latest wave of unrest began in early April after the Supreme Court stripped congress of most of its powers, a decision it later reversed amid a torrent of international criticism.

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Tensions have heightened even more since Maduro began a push last week to hold a special assembly to rewrite the constitution — opposition leaders charge the move is a ploy to keep him and his allies in power.

At least 38 people have been killed and more than 750 injured in the last six weeks.

On Monday, government officials met with political and religious leaders to discuss the planned constitutional assembly. But key opposition leaders refused to participate, contending that Maduro does not have the authority to call for a constitution rewrite without first putting the initiative to a vote by the general public.

The AP contributed to this report.