World

Afghanistan seeks international support amid end of combat mission, surge in Taliban attacks

  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, poses for the media beside Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond as he arrives at Lancaster House for the London Conference on Afghanistan in London, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014.  Afghanistan's leader was asking international politicians on Thursday to stand with his country amid the withdrawal of most foreign troops and a surge in Taliban attacks.  Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and British Prime Minister David Cameron jointly hosted a conference in London attended by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and diplomats from some 50 countries.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, poses for the media beside Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond as he arrives at Lancaster House for the London Conference on Afghanistan in London, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. Afghanistan's leader was asking international politicians on Thursday to stand with his country amid the withdrawal of most foreign troops and a surge in Taliban attacks. Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and British Prime Minister David Cameron jointly hosted a conference in London attended by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and diplomats from some 50 countries. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)  (The Associated Press)

  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry waves at the media as he arrives at Lancaster House for the London Conference on Afghanistan in London, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014.  Afghanistan's leader was asking international politicians on Thursday to stand with his country amid the withdrawal of most foreign troops and a surge in Taliban attacks.  Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and British Prime Minister David Cameron jointly hosted a conference in London attended by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and diplomats from some 50 countries.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry waves at the media as he arrives at Lancaster House for the London Conference on Afghanistan in London, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. Afghanistan's leader was asking international politicians on Thursday to stand with his country amid the withdrawal of most foreign troops and a surge in Taliban attacks. Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and British Prime Minister David Cameron jointly hosted a conference in London attended by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and diplomats from some 50 countries. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)  (The Associated Press)

  • Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani speaks to delegates and ministers during the London Conference on Afghanistan on Thursday Dec. 4, 2014 in London, England. The United States, Britain and other allies promised Thursday not to abandon Afghanistan's new government, responding to pleas by Kabul for continued support as international security missions wind down and Taliban attacks surge.  (AP Photo/Dan Kitwood/Pool)

    Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani speaks to delegates and ministers during the London Conference on Afghanistan on Thursday Dec. 4, 2014 in London, England. The United States, Britain and other allies promised Thursday not to abandon Afghanistan's new government, responding to pleas by Kabul for continued support as international security missions wind down and Taliban attacks surge. (AP Photo/Dan Kitwood/Pool)  (The Associated Press)

Afghanistan's leader is asking international politicians not to abandon his country amid the withdrawal of most foreign troops and a surge in Taliban attacks.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and British Prime Minister David Cameron are jointly hosting a London conference, attended by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and international diplomats.

Talks will focus on security, corruption and political reform. Ghani was elected in September but has yet to form a stable Cabinet. Meanwhile, insurgents have sought to destabilize his government with a series of high-profile attacks in Kabul.

Ghani has signed security agreements with Washington and NATO permitting an international military presence after the 13-year combat mission formally ends Dec. 31. Some 10,000 American troops will remain by the end of the year.