Army

Fort Hood shooter says he's going on 'hunger strike'

This undated file photo provided by the Bell County Sheriff's Department shows former Army psychiatrist Maj. Nidal Hasan

This undated file photo provided by the Bell County Sheriff's Department shows former Army psychiatrist Maj. Nidal Hasan  (AP)

Writing from his cell on death row at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, Fort Hood shooter Nidal Hasan has declared he is going on a “99 pound hunger strike,” according to a letter reviewed by Fox News.

The former Army psychiatrist, who opened fire on unarmed fellow soldiers at Fort Hood, Texas, in November 2009, killed 13 people and injured 31 that day. Hasan was sentenced to death in 2013 and continues to declare himself an SoA, “soldier of Allah.” 

Hasan stated in the handwritten letter that by going on a hunger strike, he will “reduce and then maintain a total body weight of 99 pounds” while protesting “America’s hatred for [Shariah] Laws.”

On March 27, Lt. Gen. Sean B. MacFarland, the commanding general at Fort Hood, issued a statement effectively saying Hasan will not be dismissed by the U.S. Army until he is executed.

“In the case of Major Nidal M. Hasan (redacted) … the sentence  is approved and, except for that portion of the sentence pertaining to a Dismissal from the Service and being put to death, will be executed,” he wrote. 

Hasan’s civilian attorney John Galligan told Fox News they are looking at a “very lengthy appellate process -- initially via the military appellate courts … then on to the Supreme Court and thereafter through the tangled web of federal courts.”

Retired Staff Sgt, Shawn Manning, who was shot six times by Hasan, told Fox News senior executive producer Pamela Browne, “The fact that this guy who has no regard for human life still thinks he still has the right to make a statement is tragic.”

Nearly eight years after the attack, Manning is still mired in the military’s appeal process to receive combat-related benefits for his injuries. Manning’s next hearing is scheduled for April 11 at Fort Lewis, Wash. Manning and 41 of his fellow soldiers injured and killed at  Fort Hood were finally awarded Purple Hearts in 2015.

Hasan’s 2009 massacre finally ended when he was shot by civilian police officer Sgt. Kimberly Munley. Hasan, now partially paralyzed, is one of six inmates on military death row at Fort Leavenworth.

Galligan maintains the trial was not fair. “If Major Hasan dies while the mandatory appellate process is pending, the findings and sentence will be set aside,” Galligan said. “Millions of dollars were wasted on this show trial but as I said repeatedly, he did not receive a fair trial at Fort Hood.”

Pamela K. Browne is Senior Executive Producer at the FOX News Channel (FNC) and is Director of Long-Form Series and Specials. Her journalism has been recognized with several awards. Browne first joined FOX in 1997 to launch the news magazine “Fox Files” and later, “War Stories.”

Catherine Herridge is an award-winning Chief Intelligence correspondent for FOX News Channel (FNC) based in Washington, D.C. She covers intelligence, the Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security. Herridge joined FNC in 1996 as a London-based correspondent.