Zimbabwe's President Mugabe reportedly faces immediate removal as protesters march in capital

Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe could be ousted from power “as early as tomorrow,” a former Zimbabwe Cabinet minister said Saturday.

The remark came a day after all ten of the provincial branches of Zanu-PF, the ruling party, called for the president’s resignation.

Tshinga Dube, a former war veterans minister, told The Associated Press, “we are just going to properly send the old man away as early as tomorrow or so.”

Mugabe is said to be resisting calls to step down as he remains under house arrest with his wife, Grace.

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Army commander Constantino Chiwenga, who led the military government takeover following Mugabe’s move to fire his vice president last week, is scheduled to meet with the leader for a second time on Sunday, according to Zimbabwe’s state run broadcaster. Members of the negotiating team are also expected to be in attendance.

Talks have been ongoing since the takeover to find a seamless path for Mugabe’s removal.

In an organized rally Saturday, thousands took to the streets of Harare, Zimbabwe’s capital, to demonstrate against the leader.

THOUSANDS IN ZIMBABWE CALL FOR MUGABE TO STEP DOWN

Members of the crowd gathered near the State House carried signs reading, “Mugabe must go!” and “Not coup but cool.” Protesters were also seen removing street signs bearing Mugabe’s likeness and stomping on them, as pressure builds for the 93-year-old longtime leader to step aside.

Protesters demanding President Robert Mugabe stands down march towards State House in Harare, Zimbabwe Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017. In a euphoric gathering that just days ago would have drawn a police crackdown, crowds marched through Zimbabwe's capital on Saturday to demand the departure of President Robert Mugabe, one of Africa's last remaining liberation leaders, after nearly four decades in power. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

In a euphoric gathering that just days ago would have drawn a police crackdown, crowds marched through Zimbabwe's capital on Saturday to demand the departure of President Robert Mugabe, one of Africa's last remaining liberation leaders, after nearly four decades in power.  (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

One speaker at the rally expressed popular anger at first lady Grace Mugabe, whose apparent attempts to succeed her husband were a factor in the military’s move.

“You and your husband should go today and not tomorrow,” the speaker said.

The military, who previously backed the rally, released a new statement urging protesters to be orderly and “vigilant against agent provocateurs” who might wish to discredit the push to get Mugabe to step aside.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.