Europe

Warsaw remembers ghetto uprising on 74th anniversary

  • Chief Rabbi of Poland Michael Schudrich, left, and Rabbi Moshe Bloom carry a clay jar containing fragments of old Torah scrolls during a burial ceremony at the Jewish cemetery in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, April 19, 2017.  Warsaw's Jewish community buried fragments of damaged Torah scrolls, performing the ancient ritual on the 74th anniversary of the start of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising,
 when about 750 Jews with few arms and no military training rose up on April 19, 1943, against a powerful German force that was about to send the ghetto's last survivors to death camps. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

    Chief Rabbi of Poland Michael Schudrich, left, and Rabbi Moshe Bloom carry a clay jar containing fragments of old Torah scrolls during a burial ceremony at the Jewish cemetery in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, April 19, 2017. Warsaw's Jewish community buried fragments of damaged Torah scrolls, performing the ancient ritual on the 74th anniversary of the start of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, when about 750 Jews with few arms and no military training rose up on April 19, 1943, against a powerful German force that was about to send the ghetto's last survivors to death camps. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)  (The Associated Press)

  • Rabbi Moshe Bloom covers a clay jar containing fragments of old Torah scrolls in a grave during a burial ceremony at the Jewish cemetery in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, April 19, 2017.  Warsaw's Jewish community buried fragments of damaged Torah scrolls, performing the ancient ritual on the 74th anniversary of the start of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, when about 750 Jews with few arms and no military training rose up on April 19, 1943, against a powerful German force that was about to send the ghetto's last survivors to death camps. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

    Rabbi Moshe Bloom covers a clay jar containing fragments of old Torah scrolls in a grave during a burial ceremony at the Jewish cemetery in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, April 19, 2017. Warsaw's Jewish community buried fragments of damaged Torah scrolls, performing the ancient ritual on the 74th anniversary of the start of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, when about 750 Jews with few arms and no military training rose up on April 19, 1943, against a powerful German force that was about to send the ghetto's last survivors to death camps. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)  (The Associated Press)

  • Rabbi Moshe Bloom places a clay jar containing fragments of old Torah scrolls into a grave during a burial ceremony at the Jewish cemetery in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, April 19, 2017.  Warsaw's Jewish community buried fragments of damaged Torah scrolls, performing the ancient ritual on the 74th anniversary of the start of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, when about 750 Jews with few arms and no military training rose up on April 19, 1943, against a powerful German force that was about to send the ghetto's last survivors to death camps. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

    Rabbi Moshe Bloom places a clay jar containing fragments of old Torah scrolls into a grave during a burial ceremony at the Jewish cemetery in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, April 19, 2017. Warsaw's Jewish community buried fragments of damaged Torah scrolls, performing the ancient ritual on the 74th anniversary of the start of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, when about 750 Jews with few arms and no military training rose up on April 19, 1943, against a powerful German force that was about to send the ghetto's last survivors to death camps. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)  (The Associated Press)

Polish Prime Minister Beata Szydlo and members of the country's Jewish community have taken part in observances marking the 74th anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising.

They gathered Wednesday in the former ghetto at a monument that honors those who died in the courageous but doomed revolt against the Nazi Germans who occupied Poland during World War II.

Across the city people also pinned small yellow paper daffodils to their clothes in a symbolic gesture of remembrance.

About 750 Jews with few arms and no military training rose up on April 19, 1943, against a powerful German force that was about to send the ghetto's last survivors to death camps.

The revolt was crushed the following month, and the ghetto was razed to the ground, most of its residents killed.