Europe

Mother Teresa's 'miracle' doesn't feel special, just loved

  • From left, Rev. Brian Kolodiejchuk, postulator of the cause of beatification and canonization of Mother Teresa, Marcilio Andrino, and his wife Fernanda Nascimento Rocha pose for photographers at the end of a press conference at the Vatican, Friday, Sept. 2, 2016. Andrino's cure of a viral brain infection, declared a miracle by Pope Francis earlier this year, was the final step needed to declare Mother Teresa a saint. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

    From left, Rev. Brian Kolodiejchuk, postulator of the cause of beatification and canonization of Mother Teresa, Marcilio Andrino, and his wife Fernanda Nascimento Rocha pose for photographers at the end of a press conference at the Vatican, Friday, Sept. 2, 2016. Andrino's cure of a viral brain infection, declared a miracle by Pope Francis earlier this year, was the final step needed to declare Mother Teresa a saint. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)  (The Associated Press)

  • From left, Sr. Mary Prema Pierick, Superior General of the Missionaries of Charity, Marcilio Andrino, center and his wife Fernanda Nascimento Rocha pose for photographers at the end of a press conference at the Vatican, Friday, Sept. 2, 2016. Andrino's cure of a viral brain infection, declared a miracle by Pope Francis earlier this year, was the final step needed to declare Mother Teresa a saint. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

    From left, Sr. Mary Prema Pierick, Superior General of the Missionaries of Charity, Marcilio Andrino, center and his wife Fernanda Nascimento Rocha pose for photographers at the end of a press conference at the Vatican, Friday, Sept. 2, 2016. Andrino's cure of a viral brain infection, declared a miracle by Pope Francis earlier this year, was the final step needed to declare Mother Teresa a saint. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)  (The Associated Press)

  • Marcilio Andrino, left, and his wife Fernanda Nascimento Rocha pose for photographers at the end of a press conference at the Vatican, Friday, Sept. 2, 2016. Andrino's cure of a viral brain infection, declared a miracle by Pope Francis earlier this year, was the final step needed to declare Mother Teresa a saint. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

    Marcilio Andrino, left, and his wife Fernanda Nascimento Rocha pose for photographers at the end of a press conference at the Vatican, Friday, Sept. 2, 2016. Andrino's cure of a viral brain infection, declared a miracle by Pope Francis earlier this year, was the final step needed to declare Mother Teresa a saint. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)  (The Associated Press)

The Brazilian man whose "miraculous" cure from a brain infection paved the way for Mother Teresa's canonization says he is grateful for his life but doesn't feel particularly chosen by God.

Rather, Marcilio Haddad Andrino says he is just an example of God's ample mercy and love.

At a Vatican press conference Friday ahead of the weekend canonization, Andrino said: "The merciful Lord looks at us all without distinction. Maybe it was me this time but maybe tomorrow it will be someone else. The merciful mother looks after everyone. I don't feel special."

Pope Francis in December approved the miracle after Vatican doctors and theologians determined that Andrino's cure was medically inexplicable and due to the intercession of Mother Teresa, the final step needed to canonize the nun.