Europe

Iceland prime minister faces no-confidence vote in scandal

  • FILE - This is a Wednesday June 19, 2013 file photo Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson  speaks during a press conference in Stockholm. The release of a trove of documents on offshore financial dealings of wealthy, famous and powerful people is raising questions over the use of such tactics to avoid taxes and financial oversight. Reports by a media coalition on an investigation with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists brought to light details of offshore assets and services of politicians, businesses and celebrities, based on 11.5 million records.  Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson has been named in the documents about offshore financial dealings,  (Bertil Enevag Ericson, TT, File via AP ) SWEDEN OUT

    FILE - This is a Wednesday June 19, 2013 file photo Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson speaks during a press conference in Stockholm. The release of a trove of documents on offshore financial dealings of wealthy, famous and powerful people is raising questions over the use of such tactics to avoid taxes and financial oversight. Reports by a media coalition on an investigation with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists brought to light details of offshore assets and services of politicians, businesses and celebrities, based on 11.5 million records. Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson has been named in the documents about offshore financial dealings, (Bertil Enevag Ericson, TT, File via AP ) SWEDEN OUT  (The Associated Press)

  • Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson, writes during a parliamentary session in Reykjavik on Monday April 4, 2016. Iceland's prime minister insisted Monday he would not resign after documents leaked in a media investigation allegedly link him to an offshore company that would represent a serious conflict of interest, according to information leaked from a Panamanian law firm at the center of an international tax evasion scheme. (AP Photo/Brynjar Gunnarsson)

    Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson, writes during a parliamentary session in Reykjavik on Monday April 4, 2016. Iceland's prime minister insisted Monday he would not resign after documents leaked in a media investigation allegedly link him to an offshore company that would represent a serious conflict of interest, according to information leaked from a Panamanian law firm at the center of an international tax evasion scheme. (AP Photo/Brynjar Gunnarsson)  (The Associated Press)

  • Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson, speaks during a parliamentary session in Reykjavik on Monday April 4, 2016. Iceland's prime minister insisted Monday he would not resign after documents leaked in a media investigation allegedly link him to an offshore company that would represent a serious conflict of interest, according to information leaked from a Panamanian law firm at the center of an international tax evasion scheme. (AP Photo/Brynjar Gunnarsson)

    Iceland's Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson, speaks during a parliamentary session in Reykjavik on Monday April 4, 2016. Iceland's prime minister insisted Monday he would not resign after documents leaked in a media investigation allegedly link him to an offshore company that would represent a serious conflict of interest, according to information leaked from a Panamanian law firm at the center of an international tax evasion scheme. (AP Photo/Brynjar Gunnarsson)  (The Associated Press)

The political future of Iceland's prime minister is in danger because of his reported links to an offshore account in the British Virgin Islands.

Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson faces a vote of no confidence in parliament Monday after news reports linked him and his wife to an account that was created with the help of a Panamanian law firm at the center of a massive tax evasion leak.

The revelation concerns offshore company Wintris Inc., which Gunnlaugsson allegedly set up in 2007 along with his wife Anna Sigurlaug Palsdottir.

The opposition has called for a vote against the center-right government.

Public protests are also scheduled outside parliament.

Gunnlaugsson, the head of the center-right Progressive Party, began his four-year term in 2013, five years after Iceland's financial collapse.