'National Day of the American Cowboy' blocked by Senate gridlock

Washington couldn't even wrangle the votes to pass a resolution honoring the American cowboy. 

Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., typically sees bipartisan, unanimous support on a resolution to mark July 22 as the National Day of the American Cowboy—but not this year. 

It's been stalled by Senate gridlock, reportedly for the first time since the tradition started in 2005. 

“Unanimous consents aren’t getting passed right now,” Enzi spokesman Max D’Onofrio told the Casper Star Tribune.

The 'unanimous consent' term refers to the effectively automatic approval of noncontroversial items. 

But Democrats are forcing debate and roll-call votes on nearly every item brought to the floor, as they focus their opposition on plans to repeal ObamaCare. 

There were 14 co-sponsors to the resolution this year, six of which were Democrats, from states like the Dakotas, Idaho and Montana. 

“These resolutions aren’t necessarily a time-consuming process, so it doesn’t impact his ability to do any of the important other things he’s working on,” D’Onofrio told the Star Tribune. “The cowboy image is something people in Wyoming care about.”