US

The Latest: US won't seek South Korean money for THAAD

The Latest on North Korea test-firing a missile (all times local):

9:45 p.m.

Seoul's presidential Blue House says White House National Security Adviser H. R. McMaster has confirmed that the U.S. will not be seeking South Korean money for the Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense system, or THAAD, currently being installed in the country's south.

U.S. President Donald Trump said last week that Trump said he would make the Asian ally pay $1 billion for the THAAD missile defense system now being deployed in its territory.

The Blue House said in a statement Sunday that McMaster and South Korea's Director of National Security Kim Kwan Jin spoke on the phone and reaffirmed a previous bilateral deal on cost-bearing for the THAAD deployment.

South Korea's Defense Ministry has previously said that under an agreement reached during the administration of Trump's predecessor, Barack Obama, South Korea offers the land and facilities for THAAD but not the cost of operations.

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8:38 a.m.

President Donald Trump says he believes China's president has been putting pressure on North Korea as it pursues its missile and nuclear weapons programs.

In an interview with CBS' "Face the Nation," Trump says he won't be happy if North Korea conducts a nuclear test and that he believes Chinese President Xi Jinping won't be happy, either.

Asked if that means military action, Trump responded: "I don't know. I mean, we'll see."

The interview is set to air later Sunday in the U.S.

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5:35 a.m.

Pope Francis is warning that "a good part of humanity" will be destroyed if tensions with North Korea escalate, and he is calling for diplomacy and a revived United Nations to take the lead in negotiating a resolution.

Francis was asked as he traveled back to Rome from Egypt on Saturday local time (Sunday morning Seoul time) about North Korean ballistic missile tests and U.S. warnings of "catastrophic" consequences if the world fails to stop them. He was asked specifically what he would tell U.S. President Donald Trump, who has sent a U.S. carrier to conduct drills near the Koreas, and other leaders to try to diffuse the tensions.

Francis says he would urge them to use diplomacy and negotiation "because it's the future of humanity."

"Today, a wider war will destroy not a small part of humanity, but a good part of humanity and culture. Everything. Everything, no? It would be terrible. I don't think humanity today could bear it," he told reporters.