Europe

German authorities raid over 200 sites of Islamic group

  • Police officers carry cardboard boxes out of a mosque in Hamburg, northern Germany, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016 when hundreds of police officers search about 190 offices, mosques and apartments of members and supporters of the Islamic group “The true religion” in Germany after the German government announced a ban of the organization early Tuesday. (Christian Charisius/dpa  via AP)

    Police officers carry cardboard boxes out of a mosque in Hamburg, northern Germany, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016 when hundreds of police officers search about 190 offices, mosques and apartments of members and supporters of the Islamic group “The true religion” in Germany after the German government announced a ban of the organization early Tuesday. (Christian Charisius/dpa via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Police carry cardboard boxes out of a mosque in Hamburg, northern Germany, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016 when hundreds of police officers search about 190 offices, mosques and apartments of members and supporters of the Islamic group “The true religion” in Germany after the German government announced a ban of the organization early Tuesday. (Christian Charisius/dpa  via AP)

    Police carry cardboard boxes out of a mosque in Hamburg, northern Germany, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016 when hundreds of police officers search about 190 offices, mosques and apartments of members and supporters of the Islamic group “The true religion” in Germany after the German government announced a ban of the organization early Tuesday. (Christian Charisius/dpa via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • German-language copies of the Quran sit in a storage facility of the "Lies! Verlag Gesellschaft" in Pulheim near Cologne, western Germany, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016 when hundreds of police officers searched about 190 offices, mosques and apartments of members and supporters of the Islamic group “The true religion” after the German government announced a ban of the organization early Tuesday.   (Wolfram Kastl/dpa via AP)

    German-language copies of the Quran sit in a storage facility of the "Lies! Verlag Gesellschaft" in Pulheim near Cologne, western Germany, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016 when hundreds of police officers searched about 190 offices, mosques and apartments of members and supporters of the Islamic group “The true religion” after the German government announced a ban of the organization early Tuesday. (Wolfram Kastl/dpa via AP)  (The Associated Press)

A German news agency says hundreds of police officers are searching more than 200 offices, mosques and apartments of members and supporters of the Islamic group "The true religion" that is best known for distributing free copies of the Quran across the country.

The dpa agency says police were raiding places in western Germany and Berlin Tuesday morning.

Dpa says the country's domestic intelligence service has warned that the organization glorifies jihad and allegedly helps recruit people to send them to Syria and Iraq to fight with the Islamic State group.

German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere was expected to announce the banning of the organization later Tuesday.