Europe

The Latest: Pope invites 1,500 homeless for lunch at Vatican

  • Pope Francis leaves St. Peter's Square at the Vatican at the end of a jubilee audience for workers and volunteers of mercy led by Pope Francis, Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016. The square hosts a ceremony Sunday expected to draw hundreds of thousands of admirers of Mother Teresa, a nun who before her death in 1997, cared for the destitute who were dying in the streets of India. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

    Pope Francis leaves St. Peter's Square at the Vatican at the end of a jubilee audience for workers and volunteers of mercy led by Pope Francis, Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016. The square hosts a ceremony Sunday expected to draw hundreds of thousands of admirers of Mother Teresa, a nun who before her death in 1997, cared for the destitute who were dying in the streets of India. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)  (The Associated Press)

  • A Missionaries of Charity nun arrives in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican to attend a jubilee audience for workers and volunteers of mercy, Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016. The square hosts a ceremony Sunday expected to draw hundreds of thousands of admirers of Mother Teresa, a nun who before her death in 1997, cared for the destitute who were dying in the streets of India. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

    A Missionaries of Charity nun arrives in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican to attend a jubilee audience for workers and volunteers of mercy, Saturday, Sept. 3, 2016. The square hosts a ceremony Sunday expected to draw hundreds of thousands of admirers of Mother Teresa, a nun who before her death in 1997, cared for the destitute who were dying in the streets of India. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)  (The Associated Press)

  • Irma Escuero, of New York, holds a statue of Mother Teresa prior to the start of a mass celebrated by Pope Francis where will be canonized in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016. Thousands of pilgrims thronged to St. Peter's Square on Sunday for the canonization of Mother Teresa, the tiny nun who cared for the world's most unwanted and became the icon of a Catholic Church that goes to the peripheries to tend to lost, wounded souls. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

    Irma Escuero, of New York, holds a statue of Mother Teresa prior to the start of a mass celebrated by Pope Francis where will be canonized in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016. Thousands of pilgrims thronged to St. Peter's Square on Sunday for the canonization of Mother Teresa, the tiny nun who cared for the world's most unwanted and became the icon of a Catholic Church that goes to the peripheries to tend to lost, wounded souls. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)  (The Associated Press)

The Latest on the canonization of Mother Teresa (all times local):

8:25 a.m.

Pope Francis is following in the footsteps of Mother Teresa by offering some 1,500 homeless people a pizza lunch at the Vatican after her canonization Mass.

The homeless, most of who live in shelters run by Mother Teresa's Sisters of Charity order, came to Rome overnight on buses from across Italy to take part in Sunday's Mass. They're getting seats of honor for the celebration and will then be served lunch in the lobby of the Vatican auditorium.

A Neapolitan pizza maker brought 20 people and three pizza ovens to cook the lunch, which will be served to the guests by some 250 sisters and priests of the Sisters of Charity order.

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7:20 a.m.

Thousands of pilgrims are thronging to St. Peter's Square for the canonization of Mother Teresa, the tiny nun who cared for the world's most unwanted and became the icon of a Catholic Church that goes to the peripheries to find lost, wounded souls.

Pope Francis is declaring Mother Teresa a saint at a Sunday morning Mass, making her the model of his Jubilee Year of Mercy and in some ways his entire papacy. For Francis, Mother Teresa put into action his ideal for the church to be a merciful "field hospital" for the poorest of the poor — both materially and spiritually.

Throughout the night, pilgrims prayed at vigils in area churches and flocked before dawn to the Vatican under heavy security to try to get a good spot for the Mass that was expected to draw more than 100,000 people.