Europe

Germany expresses concern over Turkey's state of emergency

  • Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks after an emergency meeting of the government in Ankara, Turkey, late Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Erdogan on Wednesday declared a three-month state of emergency following a botched coup attempt, declaring he would rid the military of the "virus" of subversion and giving the government sweeping powers to expand a crackdown that has already included mass arrests and the closure of hundreds of schools. (Kayhan Ozer/Pool Photo via AP)

    Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks after an emergency meeting of the government in Ankara, Turkey, late Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Erdogan on Wednesday declared a three-month state of emergency following a botched coup attempt, declaring he would rid the military of the "virus" of subversion and giving the government sweeping powers to expand a crackdown that has already included mass arrests and the closure of hundreds of schools. (Kayhan Ozer/Pool Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan heads an emergency meeting of the National Security Council in Ankara, Turkey, Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Turkey's National Security Council is holding an emergency meeting following a coup attempt last week that was derailed by security forces and protesters loyal to the government. Erdogan was heading the meeting Wednesday of the council, which is the highest advisory body on security issues. (Kayhan Ozer/Pool via AP)

    Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan heads an emergency meeting of the National Security Council in Ankara, Turkey, Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Turkey's National Security Council is holding an emergency meeting following a coup attempt last week that was derailed by security forces and protesters loyal to the government. Erdogan was heading the meeting Wednesday of the council, which is the highest advisory body on security issues. (Kayhan Ozer/Pool via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan wave their national flags during a pro-government rally at Kizilay main square, in Ankara, Turkey, Wednesday, July 20, 2016.  U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is calling on Turkey to provide hard evidence that a U.S.-based cleric was behind a foiled coup attempt last weekend if it wants him extradited. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

    Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan wave their national flags during a pro-government rally at Kizilay main square, in Ankara, Turkey, Wednesday, July 20, 2016. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is calling on Turkey to provide hard evidence that a U.S.-based cleric was behind a foiled coup attempt last weekend if it wants him extradited. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)  (The Associated Press)

German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier says Turkey's state of emergency should only last as long as it's "absolutely necessary."

A day after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared a three-month state of emergency following last week's failed coup, Steinmeier said it's important that "the rule of law, a sense of proportion and commensurability are preserved."

In a statement Thursday, Steinmeier said it's in Turkey's interest to "keep the state of emergency only for the duration that is absolutely necessary and then immediately end it."

Erdogan, who had been accused of autocratic conduct even before this week's tough crackdown, said the state of emergency would counter threats to Turkey.

Steinmeier said action should only be taken against those with "a provable involvement in punishable actions" and not "an alleged political attitude."