World

Amid post-revolutionary turmoil, Tunisians shun Islamists in favor of familiar figures

  • Civil servants sit at results from the Tunis region parliamentary elections in a Tunis voting center, Monday, Oct. 27, 2014. Tunisia's main secular opposition party was claiming victory on Monday over once-dominant Islamists in the country's historic parliamentary elections. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)

    Civil servants sit at results from the Tunis region parliamentary elections in a Tunis voting center, Monday, Oct. 27, 2014. Tunisia's main secular opposition party was claiming victory on Monday over once-dominant Islamists in the country's historic parliamentary elections. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)  (The Associated Press)

  • Supporters of Tunisian party Nida Tunis (Tunisia Calls) celebrate their victory in parliamentary elections in Tunis, Tuesday, Oct.28, 2014. Nida Tunis took around 35 percent of the seats of the parliament, giving it the right to present a prime minister and form a governing coalition. The Islamists trailed with just 25 percent of the seats. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)

    Supporters of Tunisian party Nida Tunis (Tunisia Calls) celebrate their victory in parliamentary elections in Tunis, Tuesday, Oct.28, 2014. Nida Tunis took around 35 percent of the seats of the parliament, giving it the right to present a prime minister and form a governing coalition. The Islamists trailed with just 25 percent of the seats. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)  (The Associated Press)

  • Supporters of Tunisian party Nida Tunis (Tunisia Calls) celebrate their victory in parliamentary elections in Tunis, Tuesday, Oct.28, 2014. Nida Tunis took around 35 percent of the seats of the parliament, giving it the right to present a prime minister and form a governing coalition. The Islamists trailed with just 25 percent of the seats. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)

    Supporters of Tunisian party Nida Tunis (Tunisia Calls) celebrate their victory in parliamentary elections in Tunis, Tuesday, Oct.28, 2014. Nida Tunis took around 35 percent of the seats of the parliament, giving it the right to present a prime minister and form a governing coalition. The Islamists trailed with just 25 percent of the seats. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)  (The Associated Press)

TUNIS, Tunisia — Tunisia's well-organized Islamists have been defeated in parliamentary elections, paying the price for the turbulent years they governed after the Arab Spring that saw the rise of terrorist groups in this North African nation.

Voters sought security and stability with familiar faces from Tunisia's more authoritarian past, but the Islamists' substantial weight in the new parliament will make them a player in any future government.

Results from the official election commission are just beginning to trickle Tuesday morning. But exit polling and statistical sampling of voting station results by observer groups have produced a remarkably uniform picture.

The party led by a veteran politician from the previous regime took around 35 percent of the seats of the parliament. The Islamists trailed with just 25 percent of them.