World

Swiss gov't relieved Credit Suisse investigation over, but more banks still in US crosshairs

  • FILE - In this April 27, 2014 file picture  Swiss flags fly at the entrance of of Swiss bank Credit Suisse in Zurich, Switzerland.E uropean bank Credit Suisse AG pleaded guilty Monday May 19, 2014  to helping wealthy Americans avoid paying taxes through secret offshore accounts and agreed to pay about US $2.6 billion. The Justice Department said it was the largest penalty imposed in any criminal tax case. Credit Suisee is the largest bank to plead guilty in more than 20 years. (AP Photo/Keystone,Patrick B. Kraemer)

    FILE - In this April 27, 2014 file picture Swiss flags fly at the entrance of of Swiss bank Credit Suisse in Zurich, Switzerland.E uropean bank Credit Suisse AG pleaded guilty Monday May 19, 2014 to helping wealthy Americans avoid paying taxes through secret offshore accounts and agreed to pay about US $2.6 billion. The Justice Department said it was the largest penalty imposed in any criminal tax case. Credit Suisee is the largest bank to plead guilty in more than 20 years. (AP Photo/Keystone,Patrick B. Kraemer)  (The Associated Press)

  • Philipp Hildebrand, Vice Chairman of US investment company Blackrock, Urs Rohner, Chairman  of the Board of Directors of Swiss Bank Credit Suisse, and Axel Weber, Chairman of the Board of Directors  of Swiss Bank UBS, from left, prepare to talk during a panel session during the Swiss International Finance Forum, in Bern, Switzerland, Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Politicians, supervisory authorities and scientists engage in an active dialogue on the future of the Swiss financial  market during the forum.  (AP Photo/Keystone,Alessandro della Valle)

    Philipp Hildebrand, Vice Chairman of US investment company Blackrock, Urs Rohner, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Swiss Bank Credit Suisse, and Axel Weber, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Swiss Bank UBS, from left, prepare to talk during a panel session during the Swiss International Finance Forum, in Bern, Switzerland, Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Politicians, supervisory authorities and scientists engage in an active dialogue on the future of the Swiss financial market during the forum. (AP Photo/Keystone,Alessandro della Valle)  (The Associated Press)

  • British Mark Branson, CEO of Swiss Financial Market Supervisory Authority FINMA, adresses a panel session during the Swiss International Finance Forum, in Bern, Switzerland, Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Politicians, supervisory authorities and scientists engage in an active dialogue on the future of the Swiss financial market during the forum.  (AP Photo/Keystone,Alessandro della Valle)

    British Mark Branson, CEO of Swiss Financial Market Supervisory Authority FINMA, adresses a panel session during the Swiss International Finance Forum, in Bern, Switzerland, Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Politicians, supervisory authorities and scientists engage in an active dialogue on the future of the Swiss financial market during the forum. (AP Photo/Keystone,Alessandro della Valle)  (The Associated Press)

Switzerland's finance minister says her government is satisfied with the U.S. deal that will allow Credit Suisse, the nation's second-biggest bank, to put its criminal investigation behind it but notes other banks remain in the crosshairs.

Finance Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf says banks including the regional cantonal lenders remain in talks to resolve charges of misconduct as part of a U.S. crackdown on foreign banks believed to be helping American tax cheats.

She told reporters Tuesday that more such cases involving investigation by the U.S. Justice Department should be resolved in coming months after Credit Suisse AG's guilty plea and $2.6 billion payment.

There are 24 cantonal banks among the 26 Swiss cantons, or states.

Credit Suisse shares were up 1 percent at 26.33 Swiss francs Tuesday.