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Two-Headed Albino Snake Gets Thanksgiving Dinner, With a Price Tag: $25,000

two-headed snake eats dinner

A rare "bicephalic" (or two-headed) albino Honduran milk snake, or Lampropeltis triangulum hondurensis, seen devouring a baby mouse. (Daniel Parker / Sunshine Serpents)

Table for two -- but beware the bill!

A rare two-headed albino Honduran milk snake was hatched a few days before Halloween in an incubation chamber by University of Central Florida biologist Daniel Parker. Now, just in time for Thanksgiving, the extraordinary snake has taken its first meal: a baby mouse.

The right head of the snake ravenously engulfed the small mouse soon after it was offered, Parker said. The snake consumed its meal in the typical serpentine manner, other than the extra head on hand to watch.

Parker, owner of reptile enthusiast site Sunshine Serpents, also announced that he was putting the rare creature up for sale -- at a whopping $25,000 (a bargain at $12,500 per head).

The eye-opening price tag would put the sale of this unusual creature on a par with reports of past sales, Parker explained, noting that this particular two-headed snake was quite the beauty.

“Not only is it insanely colorful, but the two heads are perfectly formed. The snake appears to be very healthy,” Parker added.

Two days after eating for the first time, the snake produced what one would expect as a result of the digestive process. According to Parker, this is a significant event because it suggests that the snake is functioning normally. “We were not sure exactly what was going on with this snake on the inside, but now we have a better idea,” said Parker.

Parker hopes the attention that this unusual snake has attracted has been positive for reptiles in general.

“Sometimes reptiles get a bad rap because of old prejudices and irrational superstitions,” he said. “This is a beautiful and gentle little creature. Milk snakes actually make great pets.”

Parker would like to see the snake end up at an institution where it could be viewed by the public. “This is such a special animal that I would love to see it on display at a zoo, aquarium, or serpentarium where lots of people can learn from it,” he said.