• SANTORUM: The purpose here was that -- and this is an argument that has been made by the pro-life movement for as long as I've heard the argument. I've heard it from Bill Buckley and heard it from Ronald Reagan, actually heard it from Jesse Jackson back in the 1970s, when he was pro- life. He used to make this argument all the time, that when you treat a child, a child in the womb as property, it's the equivalent of what happened during the first part of this country, when we had this huge scar on us that we did not treat blacks as people.

    And -- and the pro-life movement says, and I agree with them, that we should not treat the child in the womb as property, we should treat them as a human being and give them protections entitled under the 14th Amendment.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Well, I guess you know how Congressman Cohen feels tonight.

    SANTORUM: Well, no, I -- I -- look, I...

    VAN SUSTEREN: I'm not saying -- I'm not saying the same situation, but...

    SANTORUM: I don't think it's the same -- I'm not apologizing.

    VAN SUSTEREN: I don't -- I...

    SANTORUM: I don't think there's anything to apologize for!

    VAN SUSTEREN: I don't mean that. What I meant is that -- is how we will seize upon anything...

    SANTORUM: Yes.

    VAN SUSTEREN: ... any abuse, Democrats, Republicans or whatever, and we seize upon it and we loop it and we whatever, and we need to make sure that we get...

    SANTORUM: No, I would agree with you that -- that when I used the word "black," all of a sudden, it gives people a reason to say, Oh, he's trying to make some sort of racial comment. I was not. I was trying to talk about a historical fact of how the Constitution was interpreted and how it's interpreted today.

    VAN SUSTEREN: Senator, thank you. Always nice to see you.

    SANTORUM: Thank you.