Christians in Egypt celebrate Christmas after year marred by violence

Egypt’s Coptic Orthodox Christians -- joined by President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi -- packed into the heavily fortified Christ’s Nativity Cathedral for Christmas Eve Mass Saturday after a violent year in which they were repeatedly targeted by Islamic State militants.

In Cairo and across much of the Muslim majority country, soldiers in full combat gear joined the police in protecting churches, most of which are now equipped with metal detectors. Worshippers undergo body searches before entering and some churches have had their surrounding streets sealed off.

“We, with the grace of God, are offering a message of peace and love from here, not just to Egyptians or to the region, but to the entire world,” el-Sissi told a jubilant congregation while standing next to Pope Tawadros II, the Coptic pontiff.

“I always say this and repeat it: Destruction, ruin and killing will never be able to defeat goodness, construction, love and peace. It's impossible,” said el-Sissi, a Muslim. “Pay attention, you are our family. You are part of us. We are one and no one will ever drive a wedge between us.”

The tight security across Egypt is a precaution against possible attacks by Islamic militants who have specifically targeted Christians since December 2016, staging a series of bombings, killing about 100 people.

Coptic Orthodox priest, Tadros, center, carries communion bread during Christmas Eve Mass at Virgin Mary church in Cairo, Egypt, late Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018. The Coptic Christian population are considered to be the largest Christian community in the Middle East and observe Christmas on January 7 according to the old, Julian calendar. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

Coptic Orthodox priest, Tadros, center, carries communion bread during Christmas Eve Mass at Virgin Mary church in Cairo, Egypt, late Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018.  (AP)

CHRISTMAS IN EGYPT THIS YEAR MEANS 230,000 SECURITY FORCES TO PROTECT CHRISTIANS

Orthodox Christians are the overwhelming majority of Egypt's Christians, who account for about 10 percent of the population, or nearly 10 million. They celebrate Christmas on Jan. 7.

The new cathedral, which can house up to 9,000 worshippers, is located in Egypt's new Administrative Capital, a 45-billion-dollar, under-construction project some 28 miles east of Cairo.

El-Sissi arrived shortly after nightfall, as silver lights twinkled on the cathedral's dome, piercing the surrounding darkness. A general-turned-president, el-Sissi is viewed by most of Egypt's Christians as their protector and ally in the face of Islamists. He led the military's 2013 ouster of an Islamist president whose divisive rule alarmed many Christians fearful over their future in the country.

The consecration of the new cathedral attracted the attention of Pope Francis, the head of the Roman catholic Church who visited Egypt last year where he spoke of the need for tolerance between Muslims and Christians.

A CHRISTMAS WISH: CHRISTIANS IN THE MIDDLE EAST NEED SUPPORT TO LIVE FREE FROM PERSECUTION

Coptic Orthodox priest, Pakhomios, spreads incense during Christmas Eve Mass at Virgin Mary church in Cairo, Egypt, late Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018. The Coptic Christian population are considered to be the largest Christian community in the Middle East and observe Christmas on January 7 according to the old, Julian calendar. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

Coptic Orthodox priest, Pakhomios, spreads incense during Christmas Eve Mass at Virgin Mary church in Cairo, Egypt, late Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018.  (AP)

"I'd like to express in a special way my closeness to Orthodox Coptic Christians, and I cordially greet my brother Tawadros II in the glorious occasion of the consecration of the Cathedral of Cairo," Pope Francis said in remarks to the faithful after celebrating an Epiphany Mass Saturday in St. Peter's Basilica.

But not everyone was as positive about the new cathedral or holding Christmas Mass there.

Ishak Ibrahim, a prominent expert on Christian affairs in Egypt, said in a Facebook post that moving Mass to an "isolated" spot projected a "disappointing" message.

"Christianity never commanded us to build churches so we can boast about their size, beauty or to accord legitimacy to the sultan," he wrote. "Those in the villages , meanwhile, are hurt and see their churches ... shuttered," wrote Ibrahim, alluding to frequent instances of Muslim mobs in rural Egypt reacting violently to the construction or repair of churches, or the use of private Christian homes as places of worship.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Christopher Carbone is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @christocarbone.