Europe

Swiss voters consider streamlined citizenship for under-25s

  • In this photo taken in July 2015 provided by her grandfather, Selena Mercado poses for a photograph in front of the Geneva Jet d’Eau landmark on Geneva lake, In Geneva, Switzerland.  High-school student Mercado was born in Switzerland, has gone to school in Switzerland, considers herself Swiss and dreams of a political career here one day. But her passport is from Chile, a country that she's never set foot in but was home to her grandparents before they moved to this small Alpine nation decades ago. (Photo via AP)

    In this photo taken in July 2015 provided by her grandfather, Selena Mercado poses for a photograph in front of the Geneva Jet d’Eau landmark on Geneva lake, In Geneva, Switzerland. High-school student Mercado was born in Switzerland, has gone to school in Switzerland, considers herself Swiss and dreams of a political career here one day. But her passport is from Chile, a country that she's never set foot in but was home to her grandparents before they moved to this small Alpine nation decades ago. (Photo via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • National Councillor Walter Wobmann displays a leaflet reading "Yes to the ban on veiling'' at the reunion of the Swiss People's Party SVP in Dornach, Switzerland, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017. Swiss voters were deciding Sunday whether to make it easier for "third-generation foreigners" to get Swiss citizenship and whether to lock in competitive low tax rates for foreign companies in Switzerland. (Peter Klaunzer/Keystone via AP)

    National Councillor Walter Wobmann displays a leaflet reading "Yes to the ban on veiling'' at the reunion of the Swiss People's Party SVP in Dornach, Switzerland, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017. Swiss voters were deciding Sunday whether to make it easier for "third-generation foreigners" to get Swiss citizenship and whether to lock in competitive low tax rates for foreign companies in Switzerland. (Peter Klaunzer/Keystone via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • People count the votes  in Obersaxen , Switzerland, Sunday Feb. 12, 2017. Swiss voters were deciding Sunday whether to make it easier for "third-generation foreigners" to get Swiss citizenship and whether to lock in competitive low tax rates for foreign companies in Switzerland. (Benjamin Manser/Keystone via AP)

    People count the votes in Obersaxen , Switzerland, Sunday Feb. 12, 2017. Swiss voters were deciding Sunday whether to make it easier for "third-generation foreigners" to get Swiss citizenship and whether to lock in competitive low tax rates for foreign companies in Switzerland. (Benjamin Manser/Keystone via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Swiss voters are considering two issues that will affect immigrants and foreign companies, deciding whether to make it easier for "third-generation foreigners" to get Swiss citizenship and whether to lock in competitive, low tax rates for businesses.

The "simplified naturalization of third-generation immigrants" measure is expected to pass in Sunday's referendum. It would simplify applications for anyone under 25 whose parents and grandparents have lived in Switzerland for years.

Polls have suggested a tight race over the complex tax reform initiative, which aims to get Switzerland in line with international standards by scrapping a two-track tax system that offers lower rates to foreign firms to lure investment.

Sunday's referendum is the latest installment of Switzerland's direct democracy that gives voters a frequent say on political decisions.