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Hispanic Heritage Month Draws to a Close

AVON PARK, FL - JULY 24:   Zury Ruiz, 9, wears an American flag around her shoulders after hearing the news that the Avon Park city council voted against a proposal that would have cracked down on illegal immigration July 24, 2006 in Avon Park, Florida. The ordinance was defeated 3 votes to 2. Macklin had proposed:  fining landlords who rent to illegal immigrants; taking away business permits from companies that knowingly employs illegals; and declaring English the official language within Avon Park.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

AVON PARK, FL - JULY 24: Zury Ruiz, 9, wears an American flag around her shoulders after hearing the news that the Avon Park city council voted against a proposal that would have cracked down on illegal immigration July 24, 2006 in Avon Park, Florida. The ordinance was defeated 3 votes to 2. Macklin had proposed: fining landlords who rent to illegal immigrants; taking away business permits from companies that knowingly employs illegals; and declaring English the official language within Avon Park. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)  (2006 Getty Images)

Hispanic Heritage Month is coming to an end.

The yearly celebration of Latino histories, cultures and contributions to American society ends Friday, October 15.

The national observation begins on September 15 every year. That's when Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua gained their independence. México and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16 and September 18, respectively.

In 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson proclaimed Hispanic Heritage Week. Twenty years later, President Ronald Reagan expanded the observation to an entire month. It was enacted into law on August 17,1988.

Officially, Americans celebrate the culture and traditions of U.S. Latinos who trace their roots back to Central and South American nations and countries and the Caribbean, according to the National Hispanic Heritage Month web site from the Library of Congress.

Some Latinos observe Día de la Raza, or Columbus Day, on October 12.