Florida teacher who asked students to use gender-neutral pronouns gets transferred

canopy oaks

A teacher at a Florida elementary school has been transferred after asking students to use gender-neutral pronouns.  (Google Earth)

A Florida elementary school teacher, who sent a note home asking fifth-grade students to use gender-neutral pronouns in the classroom, was being transferred to an adult education program.

Leon County Schools officials said Tuesday that Chloe Bressack would no longer teach fifth grade at Canopy Oaks Elementary School, the Tallahassee Democrat reported. She will instead be teaching at the Adult and Community Education campus.

Superintendent Rocky Hanna said Bressack agreed "given the complexity of the issue," a transfer would be best for the teacher's career and the fifth-graders.

District spokesman Chris Petley said a handful of students transferred from the class this month after Bressack sent parents a letter asking students to use gender-neutral pronouns.   

FLORIDA TEACHER ASKS STUDENTS TO USE GENDER-NEUTRAL PRONOUNS, ANGERING PARENTS

“One thing that you should know about me is that I use gender-neutral terms. My prefix is Mx. [pronounced Mix],” Bressack wrote in the letter. “My pronouns are ‘they, them, their’ instead of ‘he, his, she, hers.' I know it takes some practice for it to feel natural, but students catch on pretty quickly.”

She added: "We're not going for perfection, just making an effort! Please feel free to reach out to me or administration if you have any questions. My priority is for all of my students to be comfortable in my classroom and have a space where they can be themselves while learning."

The note caused a divide among some parents.

FLORIDA WOMAN ARRESTED IN ‘KILLER CLOWN’ COLD CASE

 

A parent shared the letter in the Facebook group “Tally Moms Stay Connected” on Tuesday, concluding with the question: “What would your reaction be as a parent of 9 & 10-year-olds?”

The Tallahassee Democrat reported parents from opposing political views clashed in the comments section.

Bressack apologized last week "for any confusion" the letter caused. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.