Virginia

A survivor, now a dad: Virginia Tech shooting, decade later

  • FILE-In this Tuesday, April 17, 2007 file photo, People gather for a vigil on the drill field following the shootings on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Va.  Kevin Sterne has spent 10 years trying not to let himself be defined by the mass shooting that nearly killed him at Virginia Tech. But now that he's a new father, Sterne grapples with the knowledge that one day he must tell his son about the horror he worked so hard to put behind him. (AP Photo/Casey Templeton, File)

    FILE-In this Tuesday, April 17, 2007 file photo, People gather for a vigil on the drill field following the shootings on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Va. Kevin Sterne has spent 10 years trying not to let himself be defined by the mass shooting that nearly killed him at Virginia Tech. But now that he's a new father, Sterne grapples with the knowledge that one day he must tell his son about the horror he worked so hard to put behind him. (AP Photo/Casey Templeton, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In a Monday, April 16, 2007 file photo, Blacksburg police officers run from Norris Hall on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Va. as multiple shootings occur at the engineering building.  Kevin Sterne has spent 10 years trying not to let himself be defined by the mass shooting that nearly killed him at Virginia Tech. But now that he's a new father, Sterne grapples with the knowledge that one day he must tell his son about the horror he worked so hard to put behind him.  (AP Photo/The Roanoke Times, Matt Gentry, File)

    FILE - In a Monday, April 16, 2007 file photo, Blacksburg police officers run from Norris Hall on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Va. as multiple shootings occur at the engineering building. Kevin Sterne has spent 10 years trying not to let himself be defined by the mass shooting that nearly killed him at Virginia Tech. But now that he's a new father, Sterne grapples with the knowledge that one day he must tell his son about the horror he worked so hard to put behind him. (AP Photo/The Roanoke Times, Matt Gentry, File)  (The Associated Press)

Ten years after he nearly died in a mass shooting at Virginia Tech, Kevin Sterne grapples with the knowledge that one day he must tell his son about the horror he worked so hard to put behind him.

Sterne was hit twice in the April 16, 2007, shooting rampage by a mentally ill student that left 32 people dead.

Over the years, other students wounded at Tech have graduated and moved away, many becoming vocal advocates for gun control and campus safety.

But Sterne has chosen to stay out of the spotlight, remain at Tech and try to continue his life the way he imagined it would be before it was upended.

He's the only one of the injured students still at Tech, where he works at two school labs.