New York

NYPD seeks cure for gun violence with data-driven cases

  • FILE - In this Oct. 19, 2016 file photo, Rapper Bobby Shmurda, whose birth name is Ackquille Pollard, second from left, appears with his lawyer Alex Spiro, left, in a Manhattan court in New York where Shmurda was sentenced to seven years in prison on charges he conspired with a drug gang in several shootings. When a street gang best known for its affiliation with Shmurda turned a Brooklyn neighborhood into a shooting gallery two years ago, New York City police responded with a scalpel instead of an occupying force. It used data to identify and arrest the worst offenders and, working with prosecutors, got them locked up longer - a strategy they claim has brought calm to the neighborhood and helped drive down shootings by 11 percent citywide. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

    FILE - In this Oct. 19, 2016 file photo, Rapper Bobby Shmurda, whose birth name is Ackquille Pollard, second from left, appears with his lawyer Alex Spiro, left, in a Manhattan court in New York where Shmurda was sentenced to seven years in prison on charges he conspired with a drug gang in several shootings. When a street gang best known for its affiliation with Shmurda turned a Brooklyn neighborhood into a shooting gallery two years ago, New York City police responded with a scalpel instead of an occupying force. It used data to identify and arrest the worst offenders and, working with prosecutors, got them locked up longer - a strategy they claim has brought calm to the neighborhood and helped drive down shootings by 11 percent citywide. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • Visol Smith, center, a directing supervisor with Rock Safe Streets, a gun violence intervention program in Far Rockaway run by the nonprofit Sheltering Arms, place flyers about the program's latest anti-violence campaign on neighborhood cars, Friday Dec. 9, 2016, in New York.  Even as homicide rates have climbed in other American cities, New York City is again on pace to have a near-record low number of shootings, and police are partly crediting refined tactics that include collecting more data and forensic evidence than ever before to go after the worst offenders. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

    Visol Smith, center, a directing supervisor with Rock Safe Streets, a gun violence intervention program in Far Rockaway run by the nonprofit Sheltering Arms, place flyers about the program's latest anti-violence campaign on neighborhood cars, Friday Dec. 9, 2016, in New York. Even as homicide rates have climbed in other American cities, New York City is again on pace to have a near-record low number of shootings, and police are partly crediting refined tactics that include collecting more data and forensic evidence than ever before to go after the worst offenders. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)  (The Associated Press)

  • Community outreach workers leave the office of Rock Safe Streets, a gun violence intervention program in Far Rockaway run by the nonprofit Sheltering Arms, to "get the word" out about their campaigns to stop the violence, Friday Dec. 9, 2016, in New York.  Even as homicide rates have climbed in other American cities, New York City is again on pace to have a near-record low number of shootings, and police are partly crediting refined tactics that include collecting more data and forensic evidence than ever before to go after the worst offenders. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

    Community outreach workers leave the office of Rock Safe Streets, a gun violence intervention program in Far Rockaway run by the nonprofit Sheltering Arms, to "get the word" out about their campaigns to stop the violence, Friday Dec. 9, 2016, in New York. Even as homicide rates have climbed in other American cities, New York City is again on pace to have a near-record low number of shootings, and police are partly crediting refined tactics that include collecting more data and forensic evidence than ever before to go after the worst offenders. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)  (The Associated Press)

Even as homicide rates have climbed in several U.S. cities, New York is on pace to have a near-record low number of shootings.

Through Dec. 4, the city recorded 942 shooting incidents, putting the city on course to have the fewest people killed or wounded by gunfire since the police department began counting shootings in 1993.

City police are partly crediting refined tactics that include collecting more data and forensic evidence than ever before to go after the worst offenders.

Investigators study forensic evidence from other shootings, tips from informants and logs of suspects who survived shootings. All of it is cross-referenced to identify the worst offenders and develop cases that could put them away longer.

The decline comes in an era when the department is making fewer arrests overall.