DISASTERS

After Matthew, some second-guess decision to evacuate

  • Debris lies on a portion of the damaged A1A Highway which was closed in Flagler Beach, Fla., on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016, after pounding surf from Hurricane Matthew which brushed Florida's east coast. (Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

    Debris lies on a portion of the damaged A1A Highway which was closed in Flagler Beach, Fla., on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016, after pounding surf from Hurricane Matthew which brushed Florida's east coast. (Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Debris lies on a portion of the damaged A1A Highway which was closed in Flagler Beach, Fla., on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016, after pounding surf from Hurricane Matthew which brushed Florida's east coast. (Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

    Debris lies on a portion of the damaged A1A Highway which was closed in Flagler Beach, Fla., on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016, after pounding surf from Hurricane Matthew which brushed Florida's east coast. (Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Onlookers walk along a section of highway A1A that was washed out by Hurricane Matthew, Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016, in Flagler Beach, Fla.  The damage from Matthew caused  beach erosion,  washed out some roads and knocked out power for more than 1 million customers in several coastal counties.  (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Onlookers walk along a section of highway A1A that was washed out by Hurricane Matthew, Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016, in Flagler Beach, Fla. The damage from Matthew caused beach erosion, washed out some roads and knocked out power for more than 1 million customers in several coastal counties. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)  (The Associated Press)

Some of the 2 million residents ordered to evacuate the Southeast ahead of Hurricane Matthew say they will think twice next time about leaving.

Maureen Miller stayed at a hotel inland, but her Georgia home made it through the storm unscathed. She says leaving and returning was a hassle, and she won't do it next time.

Weather experts and government officials worry that people who quickly packed up and left but suffered little or no damage might be reluctant to evacuate next time, leading to deadly consequences.

They say there is no reason to second-guess the decision to evacuate because you never know exactly where the storm and damage will happen.