New York

NYPD bee squad ready for sting operation on urban swarms

  • In this Aug. 4, 2015 photo provided by the New York City Police Department, Detective Daniel Higgins begins the process of removing bees enveloping the front of a bicycle parked in New York's Midtown Manhattan neighborhood. Higgins' main NYPD job is as a counterterrorism expert, but he is also part of a special team of officers that responds to emergency calls reporting swarms of bees that suddenly cluster in spots around New York City. (NYPD/@nypdbees via AP)

    In this Aug. 4, 2015 photo provided by the New York City Police Department, Detective Daniel Higgins begins the process of removing bees enveloping the front of a bicycle parked in New York's Midtown Manhattan neighborhood. Higgins' main NYPD job is as a counterterrorism expert, but he is also part of a special team of officers that responds to emergency calls reporting swarms of bees that suddenly cluster in spots around New York City. (NYPD/@nypdbees via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Aug. 4, 2015 photo provided by the New York City Police Department, bees envelop the front of a bicycle parked in New York's Midtown Manhattan neighborhood. The NYPD has a special team of officers that responds to emergency calls reporting swarms of bees that suddenly cluster in spots around New York City. (NYPD/@nypdbees via AP)

    In this Aug. 4, 2015 photo provided by the New York City Police Department, bees envelop the front of a bicycle parked in New York's Midtown Manhattan neighborhood. The NYPD has a special team of officers that responds to emergency calls reporting swarms of bees that suddenly cluster in spots around New York City. (NYPD/@nypdbees via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this July 15, 2015 photo provided by the New York City Police Department, Detective Daniel Higgins suctions up some bees left over from a swarm that took over a pedestrian traffic light in Manhattan the previous day along the route of the Puerto Rican DayParade in New York. Higgins' main NYPD job is as a counterterrorism expert, but he is also part of a special team of officers that responds to emergency calls reporting swarms of bees that suddenly cluster in spots around New York City. (NYPD/@nypdbees via AP)

    In this July 15, 2015 photo provided by the New York City Police Department, Detective Daniel Higgins suctions up some bees left over from a swarm that took over a pedestrian traffic light in Manhattan the previous day along the route of the Puerto Rican DayParade in New York. Higgins' main NYPD job is as a counterterrorism expert, but he is also part of a special team of officers that responds to emergency calls reporting swarms of bees that suddenly cluster in spots around New York City. (NYPD/@nypdbees via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Daniel Higgins is one cop who knows a thing or two about sting operations.

While the New York Police Department detective's main job is working in a counterterrorism unit, he is also one of two department beekeepers who dons protective gear and heads to the scene when buzzing swarms of the insects glom onto buildings, streetlights or other pieces of the urban landscape.

The NYPD bee brigade gets sent on dozens of calls each spring and summer.

Recent calls included some where officers used vacuums to remove grotesque masses of tens of thousands of bees from a lamp post near Grand Central Terminal, the awning of a restaurant and even a chained bicycle near Times Square.

Higgens says the removed bees are donated to local beekeepers.