The Latest on the shooting of police officers in Dallas (all times local):

1:40 a.m.

The gunman who killed five police officers at a protest march had practiced military-style drills in his yard and trained at a private self-defense school that teaches special tactics, including "shooting on the move," a maneuver in which an attacker fires and changes position before firing again.

Micah Johnson, an Army veteran, received instruction at the Academy of Combative Warrior Arts in the Dallas suburb of Richardson about two years ago, said the school's founder and chief instructor, Justin J. Everman.

Everman's statement was corroborated by a police report from May 8, 2015, when someone at a business a short distance away called in a report of several suspicious people in a parked SUV.

The investigating officer closed the case just minutes after arriving at a strip mall. While there, the officer spoke to Johnson, who said he "had just gotten out of a class at a nearby self-defense school."

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9:10 p.m.

The owner of a community social services organization says the gunman who killed five police officers at a Dallas protest march worked for his organization.

Dallas-based Touch of Kindness subcontracts with the state to provide care for people with disabilities.

Owner Jeppi Carnegie says that Micah Johnson was paid to care for his brother, who was in his early 20s.

Carnegie said Johnson, until his death this week, received an hourly wage to look after his brother at the home in Mesquite where both men lived with their mother. Carnegie said he spoke with Johnson only once by phone, for less than a minute, and only then to confirm that he would be taking care of his brother.

Johnson was killed Friday morning by police