New evidence in a 35-year-old Jane Doe cold case murder out of Ohio suggests the young victim may have ties to Connecticut, Fox 61 reports.

State-of-the-art testing on clothes the victim was wearing indicates she may have lived in Connecticut, the station reported Friday.

The victim was found in April 1981 in a ditch along a road near Troy, a small town in western Ohio.

She was wearing a tan fringed buckskin leather poncho and bell bottom blue jeans.

She has never been identified.

Pollen recovered from her clothes shows she may have spent a significant amount of time in the northeast dry-oak forest region of the U.S., which includes Connecticut, the station reported.

“Dominant pollen that was found on this young lady’s clothing was oak,” Carol Schweitzer, of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, told the station.

“In addition, there was a lot of spruce and hemlock and those three pollens the researcher was able to articulate were from the northeastern U.S., probably in a very heavy forest area,” she said.

Similar testing, which is new technology, was used to solve the missing Baby Doe case last year in Massachusetts, according to Fox 61. The body of the 2-year-old girl was confirmed to from the Boston area and she was later identified as Bella Bond.

Detectives with the Miami County Sheriff’s office said the victim was in her late teens or early 20s, 5-foot-6 and 125 pounds.

They released images that are a facial reconstruction created by a National Center for Missing and Exploited Children forensic artist. The images show what the victim may have looked life when she was alive.

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