South Carolina

Rotting bananas trigger protest for diversity at Clemson

  • Clemson University graduate student A.D. Carson stands with other students during a sit-in protest about diversity at Sikes Hall on Monday, April 18, 2016, in Clemson, SC. Students have spent a week at Sikes Hall, calling for Clemson to be more diverse. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Collins)

    Clemson University graduate student A.D. Carson stands with other students during a sit-in protest about diversity at Sikes Hall on Monday, April 18, 2016, in Clemson, SC. Students have spent a week at Sikes Hall, calling for Clemson to be more diverse. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Collins)  (The Associated Press)

  • Clemson University students stage a sit-in protest calling for more diversity on Monday, April 18, 2016, in Clemson, SC. Students have spent a week at Sikes Hall. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Collins)

    Clemson University students stage a sit-in protest calling for more diversity on Monday, April 18, 2016, in Clemson, SC. Students have spent a week at Sikes Hall. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Collins)  (The Associated Press)

  • Clemson University junior political science major Rae-Nessha White, left, talks to other students during a sit-in protest about diversity on Monday, April 18, 2016, in Clemson, SC. Students have spent a week at Sikes Hall, calling for Clemson to be more diverse. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Collins)

    Clemson University junior political science major Rae-Nessha White, left, talks to other students during a sit-in protest about diversity on Monday, April 18, 2016, in Clemson, SC. Students have spent a week at Sikes Hall, calling for Clemson to be more diverse. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Collins)  (The Associated Press)

After rotting bananas were hung from an African-American history banner on campus, some students at Clemson University have spent the past week in a sit-in protest calling for more diversity.

The #SikesSitIn demonstration started April 13 at the university's administration building. It continues Wednesday.

Black students say racism frequently raises its head, with offensive messages left on the anonymous social media application Yik Yak and white fraternity boys dressing as black gang members at a "Cripmas" party.

Just 6 percent of Clemson students are black in a state where nearly a third of the people are African-American.

Clemson insists it's aware of the problem. The school is giving more money in scholarships for minorities and to recruit minority faculty. It also hired a chief diversity officer who started Monday.