Homicide

Jurors hear dying wife on 911 recording to open trial of researcher charged with poisoning her

  • Dr. Robert Ferrante, center, is escorted by Allegheny County Sheriffs deputies to court during jury selection for his trial on homicide charges in the 2013 killing of his neurologist wife with cyanide on Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in Pittsburgh. Ferrante has denied the allegations. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

    Dr. Robert Ferrante, center, is escorted by Allegheny County Sheriffs deputies to court during jury selection for his trial on homicide charges in the 2013 killing of his neurologist wife with cyanide on Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in Pittsburgh. Ferrante has denied the allegations. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)  (The Associated Press)

  • Dr. Robert Ferrante is escorted by Allegheny County Sheriffs deputies to court during jury selection for his trial on homicide charges in the 2013 killing of his neurologist wife with cyanide on Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in Pittsburgh. Ferrante has denied the allegations. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

    Dr. Robert Ferrante is escorted by Allegheny County Sheriffs deputies to court during jury selection for his trial on homicide charges in the 2013 killing of his neurologist wife with cyanide on Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in Pittsburgh. Ferrante has denied the allegations. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)  (The Associated Press)

  • Dr. Robert Ferrante, center, follows his attorneys, William Difenderfer, left, and Wendy Williams, right, as he is escorted by Allegheny County Sheriffs deputies to court  on Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in Pittsburgh. during jury selection for his trial on homicide charges in the 2013 killing of his neurologist wife with cyanide. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

    Dr. Robert Ferrante, center, follows his attorneys, William Difenderfer, left, and Wendy Williams, right, as he is escorted by Allegheny County Sheriffs deputies to court on Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in Pittsburgh. during jury selection for his trial on homicide charges in the 2013 killing of his neurologist wife with cyanide. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)  (The Associated Press)

Jurors heard from prosecution and defense attorneys — and then from the dying woman herself — at the start of a homicide trial for a University of Pittsburgh researcher charged with poisoning his wife.

The prosecution says 41-year-old Dr. Autumn Klein can be heard "gasping and groaning and moaning and dying" on the 911 call by her husband, Dr. Robert Ferrante.

Attorneys for the 66-year-old researcher contend that Ferrante did not poison his wife, a neurologist. He also says medical experts will show she wasn't poisoned by anyone and died of unexplained causes.

The jury heard the frantic — and at times ghastly — 911 call from the first witness, an emergency dispatcher.

Prosecutors want a first-degree murder conviction, punishable by life in prison.