Accused rapist Dominique Strauss-Kahn has been a golden boy in France's Socialist movement, inspiring T-shirts that borrowed from Barack Obama's presidential campaign -- and even earning a featured spot as a blogger for the Huffington Post website.

The IMF chief behind bars in a New York City jail on sexual assault charges was a frequent blogger for the left-leaning site owned by Arianna Huffington. The first entry was posted on Jan. 22, 2010, the last on March 31, in which he discussed being in Nanjing, China, for a high-level seminar on the international monetary system.

A spokesman for the Huffington Post did not reply to an email request for comment.

A March meeting with Finance Ministers of the Americas and Caribbean was focused on the challenge of insuring that “favorable conditions today do not come at the expense of a bust tomorrow,” he wrote.

“Canada is a good example of 'managing the good times,' but as in many countries across the globe, some challenges remain.”

The entries written by the man known as the Great Seducer were featured in either the website’s World or Business sections.

Strauss-Kahn’s Huffington Post entries also appear on the IMF’s iMF Direct blog.

Some posts offer glimpses into his childhood; others into the life of the global jetsetter before his confinement in a tiny New York jail cell.  

In what appears to be his first post, dated January 2010, Strauss-Kahn wove in boyhood memories of Morocco in a post called “Why We Need a "Marshall Plan" for Haiti,” on the aftermath of the Haiti earthquake.

"Above all, there is the strong sense that Africa's destiny will be driven by Africans, not by others," wrote the Frenchman in a post called “Africa is Back,” about a year before he was accused of sexually assaulting an African immigrant working at a posh New York hotel. 

In another March post called, "Latin America: Making the Good Times Better,” he asked, “As the region enjoys a time of abundance--una epoca de vacas gordas--can there be too much of a good thing?

“We all know how this story can end if policymakers don't act early enough to prevent boom from turning into bust.”

His lengthy bio on the Huffington Post website has not been updated to include the IMF chief’s recent arrest.