NFL

Task force sends St. Louis' stadium proposal to NFL

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon’s task force has released a new round of stadium and property renderings by HOK in St. Louis on March 2, 2015. The new renderings reflect input received over the past seven weeks from the NFL and St. Louis Rams, as well as stakeholders in the project including Ameren, the Terminal Railroad Association, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and others. The task force is developing plans for an open-air NFL stadium project on the North Riverfront of downtown St. Louis that could be the new home for the Rams, as well as related enhancements to the Edward Jones Dome and America’s Center convention facility. Rendering by HOK/UPI

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon’s task force has released a new round of stadium and property renderings by HOK in St. Louis on March 2, 2015. The new renderings reflect input received over the past seven weeks from the NFL and St. Louis Rams, as well as stakeholders in the project including Ameren, the Terminal Railroad Association, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and others. The task force is developing plans for an open-air NFL stadium project on the North Riverfront of downtown St. Louis that could be the new home for the Rams, as well as related enhancements to the Edward Jones Dome and America’s Center convention facility. Rendering by HOK/UPI

ST. LOUIS -- A task force commissioned by Missouri's governor has sent to the National Football League its proposal for a billion-dollar stadium along the Mississippi River.

The nearly 400-page tome submitted by the group a day ahead of the deadline is meant to either retain the Rams or attract a new team if owner Stan Kroenke moves the franchise.

The Rams, Oakland Raiders and San Diego Chargers are seeking to move to the Los Angeles area. League owners are expected to consider the matter during meetings Jan. 12-13.

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The St. Louis proposal calls for $150 million from the city, $300 million from the league, $250 million from the team owner and $160 million in fan seat licenses. The rest of the money comes from the state, either through tax credits or bonds.