How to turn immigrants into full-blooded Americans

What does it mean to be an American — and can an immigrant arriving to this country today ever achieve that?

Michael Anton, a lecturer and research fellow at Hillsdale College and a former national-security official in the Trump administration, argued in The Washington Post last week that the US should end birthright citizenship. His idea is noxious — and unconstitutional, as the 14th amendment grants birthright citizenship. But it raises the question of when and how someone can become an American and what exactly that means.

In Anton’s estimation, the child of someone here illegally, or temporarily, shouldn’t be granted immediate US citizenship upon their birth. But it’s that unique quirk of our law that does so much toward promoting an American culture. It doesn’t matter your background or who your parents were; you’re one of us, simply by being born here.

Following France winning the FIFA World Cup final in Russia, “Daily Show” host Trevor Noah congratulated the team by saying “Africa won the World Cup.” “I get it, they have to say it’s the French team,” Noah said. “But look at those guys. You don’t get that tan by hanging out in the south of France, my friends.”

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Karol Markowicz is a columnist at the New York Post. She has also written for Time, USA Today, The Observer, Heat Street, Federalist, Daily Beast and elsewhere.