• With: Neil Cavuto

    Let me see if I've got this straight.

    All this stuff that was once supposed to be bad for us is now good for us?

    Coffee won't kill you. Some of its antioxidants are actually good for you.

    Whole milk won't make you fat. Turns out too much skim milk makes you crave fat. Then you get fat.

    Chocolate used to give you pimples and pack on the pounds. Now it's loaded with nutrients that can ward off strokes.

    Who knew?

    My grandmother knew, that's who.

    An Italian immigrant who knew a little wine wouldn't kill you, but whining about it just might.

    I guess what's got me thinking about all this stuff is the government set to once again issue sweeping new warnings and demanding much more detailed labels about lots more stuff.

    Leaving aside the costs of forcing food companies to pay for all these new labels. Can we just save them and us the trouble? And just write them in pencil?

    I mean, wasn't it the FDA that said popcorn kills. And lo and behold we learn popcorn, with or without the butter, improves your memory?

    I don't remember the government dialing that label back.

    Just like I don't remember the FDA acknowledging that maybe ditching all eggs was a bad idea since Americans were ditching too much protein, which wasn't egg-zactly what the food police intended.

    But proved yet again, how scrambled their dietary messages were and are.

    My grandmother could have told them, measure less. Think more.

    Manjia moron!

    You know, there ought to be an oops label for government.

    Put a dollar sign at the end of that oops.

    To remind us of the costs of enforcing regulations have changed.

    And needlessly scaring Americans out of their wits over it.

    There ought to be a statute of limitations on warnings that go bad, just like we put on foods that go bad.

    Just say, "for now, we think coffee is hurting your ticker," get back to us later when we conclude it's also improving your memory.

    Saturated fats are bad and then they aren't.

    Then it's trans-fats that'll kill you until they don't.

    Back to my grandmother who lived into her 90's believing everything in moderation, but pretty much everything on the table.

    She set it.

    Her kids and grandkids did ok by it.

    She didn't have a formal education.

    But she sure was stove-smart.

    She got life.

    Not looking at labels.

    But looking after her kids.

    And embracing if it tastes too good to be true, savor just don't go nuts over it.

    Oh, but that was before the FDA warnings on nuts.

    Eat too many and you might get sick.

    Listen to too many in Washington and you'll just go nuts.