The Americas

UN chief in Haiti to get glimpse of Matthew's destruction

  • People walk along a street lined with damaged and destroyed houses, in southwestern Haiti, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016. A week and a half after Hurricane Matthew devastated southwestern Haiti, aid is slowly starting to arrive in rural towns, patch-work roofs made from scraps abound, and some families are living in makeshift shelters crafted from the debris.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

    People walk along a street lined with damaged and destroyed houses, in southwestern Haiti, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016. A week and a half after Hurricane Matthew devastated southwestern Haiti, aid is slowly starting to arrive in rural towns, patch-work roofs made from scraps abound, and some families are living in makeshift shelters crafted from the debris.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)  (The Associated Press)

  • Residents stand amidst the rubble of destroyed homes as they watch a U.S. military helicopter land to deliver USAID relief supplies in Anse d'Hainault, southwestern Haiti, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016. Two U.S. military helicopters touched down briefly on Friday morning to deliver drinking water and saline to the remote town, which has seen a spike in cholera cases after suffering severe damage from Hurricane Matthew. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

    Residents stand amidst the rubble of destroyed homes as they watch a U.S. military helicopter land to deliver USAID relief supplies in Anse d'Hainault, southwestern Haiti, Friday, Oct. 14, 2016. Two U.S. military helicopters touched down briefly on Friday morning to deliver drinking water and saline to the remote town, which has seen a spike in cholera cases after suffering severe damage from Hurricane Matthew. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)  (The Associated Press)

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has arrived in Haiti to see firsthand a sliver of the extensive damage and destruction left by Hurricane Matthew.

Ban was greeted Saturday by Prime Minister Enex Jean-Charles after he stepped out of a U.N. jet at the airport in Haiti's capital of Port-au-Prince.

He then boarded a helicopter traveling to the storm-damaged southern city of Les Cayes, where he was to visit one of many schools serving as an emergency shelter for families who lost homes.

Matthew's eye made landfall Oct. 4 in a rugged region of southwest Haiti that's home to more than 1 million people.

Haitian authorities have reported that the death toll was 546, though it's likely to climb higher as reports continue to come in from remote areas.