The Americas

Brazil's ousted president blasts process, talks about future

  • In this Aug. 29, 2016 photo, suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff reacts during her impeachment trial at the Federal Senate in Brasilia, Brazil. Rousseff's scheduled appearance during her impeachment trial is the culmination of a fight going back to late last year, when opponents in Congress presented a measure seeking to remove her from office. Rousseff was eventually ousted and her vice president and rival Michel Temer was sworn in. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    In this Aug. 29, 2016 photo, suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff reacts during her impeachment trial at the Federal Senate in Brasilia, Brazil. Rousseff's scheduled appearance during her impeachment trial is the culmination of a fight going back to late last year, when opponents in Congress presented a measure seeking to remove her from office. Rousseff was eventually ousted and her vice president and rival Michel Temer was sworn in. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

  • Demonstrators run amid tear gas during clashes with the police during a protest against Brazil's President Michel Temer in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016. Temer was sworn in as Brazil's new leader on Wednesday following the ouster of President Dilma Rousseff. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

    Demonstrators run amid tear gas during clashes with the police during a protest against Brazil's President Michel Temer in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016. Temer was sworn in as Brazil's new leader on Wednesday following the ouster of President Dilma Rousseff. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)  (The Associated Press)

  • Brazil's former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, right, embraces Worker's Party President Rui Falcao, as he arrives to meet with the Workers Party National Executive Committee to discuss the political situation after President Dilma Rousseff was removed from office, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Friday, Sept. 2, 2016. When Rousseff was kicked out of power this week, she became the biggest casualty of a massive corruption probe. While Rousseff has never been implicated, many accuse her of trying protect her mentor and predecessor, Lula, who was charged in July with obstruction of justice in the probe.  (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

    Brazil's former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, right, embraces Worker's Party President Rui Falcao, as he arrives to meet with the Workers Party National Executive Committee to discuss the political situation after President Dilma Rousseff was removed from office, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Friday, Sept. 2, 2016. When Rousseff was kicked out of power this week, she became the biggest casualty of a massive corruption probe. While Rousseff has never been implicated, many accuse her of trying protect her mentor and predecessor, Lula, who was charged in July with obstruction of justice in the probe. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)  (The Associated Press)

Former President Dilma Rousseff, who was ousted this week, is slamming the process that led to her demise and promising to provide a strong opposition voice to the new government.

In comments to foreign media Friday, Rousseff said she would be moving back to her hometown of Porto Alegre in southern Brazil.

Rousseff says she has not developed plans beyond that, but won't shy away from public life.

The Senate voted to remove Rousseff for breaking fiscal responsibility laws in her management of the federal budget.

Rousseff also had sharp words for Michel Temer, who was her vice president before taking over in the wake of her removal. She said that if he doesn't govern on the platform the two ran on, people will see his government as illegitimate.