The Americas

Brazil president suggests referendum after impeachment trial

  • FILE - In this  Oct. 6, 2014 file photo, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff listens to a question during a re-election campaign news conference at the Alvorada Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil. Rousseff's government had become paralyzed during her last months in office. When Rousseff was impeached, the once-popular leader’s approval ratings hovered around 10 percent and polls showed that 61 percent of Brazilians wanted her out. Perhaps the biggest catalyst for her downfall, though, was the worst recession to hit Latin America’s largest economy since the 1930s, which has no end in sight. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres, File)

    FILE - In this Oct. 6, 2014 file photo, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff listens to a question during a re-election campaign news conference at the Alvorada Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil. Rousseff's government had become paralyzed during her last months in office. When Rousseff was impeached, the once-popular leader’s approval ratings hovered around 10 percent and polls showed that 61 percent of Brazilians wanted her out. Perhaps the biggest catalyst for her downfall, though, was the worst recession to hit Latin America’s largest economy since the 1930s, which has no end in sight. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this May 12, 2016 photo, Brazil's acting President Michel Temer smiles as he stands with his newly appointed ministers, during the inauguration ceremony at the Planalto presidential palace in Brasilia, Brazil. In light of a series of damaging leaked audiotapes, the abrupt exit of two ministers, allegations of corruption against other interim officials and baffling decisions by Temer, including appointing a Cabinet of all white men, some senators say they are reconsidering their final vote on the impeachment of suspended President Dilma Rousseff. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    In this May 12, 2016 photo, Brazil's acting President Michel Temer smiles as he stands with his newly appointed ministers, during the inauguration ceremony at the Planalto presidential palace in Brasilia, Brazil. In light of a series of damaging leaked audiotapes, the abrupt exit of two ministers, allegations of corruption against other interim officials and baffling decisions by Temer, including appointing a Cabinet of all white men, some senators say they are reconsidering their final vote on the impeachment of suspended President Dilma Rousseff. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is suggesting she would hold a national referendum on her presidency if she survives an impeachment trial expected for August.

Rousseff said in an interview aired by state-run TV Brasil Thursday night that Brazilians should be "consulted" on the future, even if the Senate does not permanently remove her from office.

Such a vote could lead to a new presidential election.

Rousseff was impeached and suspended May 12 amid allegations she broke fiscal laws, though she says she did nothing wrong.

Lawmakers who support neither her nor acting President Michel Temer have called for new elections to resolve the political crisis.

Temer has become as unpopular as Rousseff and has already lost two ministers to corruption probes. Members of his inner circle are also under investigation.