The Americas

Argentina floods swamp soy crop; some must commute by boat

  • People row boats on a flooded street of Villa Paranacito, Entre Rios, Argentina, Thursday, April 28, 2016. The Argentine Red Cross estimates that around 30,000 people have been affected after rains swelled rivers, swamping fields and towns nationwide. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

    People row boats on a flooded street of Villa Paranacito, Entre Rios, Argentina, Thursday, April 28, 2016. The Argentine Red Cross estimates that around 30,000 people have been affected after rains swelled rivers, swamping fields and towns nationwide. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)  (The Associated Press)

  • A cow stands beside the road in Entre Rios, Argentina, Thursday, April 28, 2016. Animals in the country side are suffering from starvation in several Argentine provinces after the rains swelled rivers, swamping fields and towns nationwide.(AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

    A cow stands beside the road in Entre Rios, Argentina, Thursday, April 28, 2016. Animals in the country side are suffering from starvation in several Argentine provinces after the rains swelled rivers, swamping fields and towns nationwide.(AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)  (The Associated Press)

  • Margaret Chozza stands outside her house on the flooded town of Villa Paranacito, Entre Rios, Argentina, Thursday, April 28, 2016. The Argentine Red Cross estimates that around 30,000 people have been affected after rains swelled rivers, swamping fields and towns nationwide. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

    Margaret Chozza stands outside her house on the flooded town of Villa Paranacito, Entre Rios, Argentina, Thursday, April 28, 2016. The Argentine Red Cross estimates that around 30,000 people have been affected after rains swelled rivers, swamping fields and towns nationwide. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)  (The Associated Press)

Water levels in the flood-hit Argentine town of Villa Paranacito have risen so much that the best way for residents to commute is by boat.

The town in eastern Argentina is one of the worst-struck by weeks of heavy rains stemming from the El Nino weather phenomenon. Authorities have evacuated thousands of people across Argentina.

Flood waters have reached grazing grounds, drowning livestock in the leading meat producing country. They have also swamped about a third of Argentina's soy farms, causing big losses to one of the world's top grains suppliers.

Soybean prices at the Chicago Board of Trade fell Friday, after rising for weeks to nearly a one year-high on growing concerns about the damaged crops in Argentina, which is the world's No. 3 soy exporter.