The Americas

Brazil's PMDB party abandons Rousseff, quits coalition

  • Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff smiles during a meeting with Brazilian Ambassador Roberto Azevedo, director general of the World Trade Organization, at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Tuesday, March 29, 2016. Former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva said Monday that he believes Rousseff, his embattled successor and protege, can survive mounting pressure in Congress for her impeachment. Rousseff recently appointed Silva as her chief of staff in a much-discussed move that still must be confirmed by Brazil's top court. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff smiles during a meeting with Brazilian Ambassador Roberto Azevedo, director general of the World Trade Organization, at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Tuesday, March 29, 2016. Former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva said Monday that he believes Rousseff, his embattled successor and protege, can survive mounting pressure in Congress for her impeachment. Rousseff recently appointed Silva as her chief of staff in a much-discussed move that still must be confirmed by Brazil's top court. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

  • Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff attends a meeting with Brazilian Ambassador Roberto Azevedo, director general of the World Trade Organization, at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Tuesday, March 29, 2016. Former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva said Monday that he believes Rousseff, his embattled successor and protege, can survive mounting pressure in Congress for her impeachment. Rousseff recently appointed Silva as her chief of staff in a much-discussed move that still must be confirmed by Brazil's top court. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff attends a meeting with Brazilian Ambassador Roberto Azevedo, director general of the World Trade Organization, at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Tuesday, March 29, 2016. Former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva said Monday that he believes Rousseff, his embattled successor and protege, can survive mounting pressure in Congress for her impeachment. Rousseff recently appointed Silva as her chief of staff in a much-discussed move that still must be confirmed by Brazil's top court. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this March 2, 2016 file photo, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff talks with her Vice President Michel Temer, during a meeting at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil. The Brazilian Democratic Movement Party, (PMDB), of which Temer is the leader, said on Tuesday, March 29, 2016, that its members are leaving Rousseff's governing coalition. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres, File)

    FILE - In this March 2, 2016 file photo, Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff talks with her Vice President Michel Temer, during a meeting at the Planalto Presidential Palace, in Brasilia, Brazil. The Brazilian Democratic Movement Party, (PMDB), of which Temer is the leader, said on Tuesday, March 29, 2016, that its members are leaving Rousseff's governing coalition. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres, File)  (The Associated Press)

Brazil's largest party is abandoning President Dilma Rousseff's government in a decision that diminishes the possibility that she will survive mounting pressure in Congress for her impeachment.

The Brazilian Democratic Movement Party known as the PMDB said on Tuesday that its members are leaving Rousseff's governing coalition. The decision was reported by state news agency Agencia Brasil.

The leader of the Democratic Movement party is Brazil's vice president Michel Temer.

He has vowed to help Rousseff keep her job despite plunging in her popularity amid Brazil's worst recession in decades and a string of corruption scandals.

Temer would assume the presidency if Rousseff is impeached for breaking fiscal laws.