RELIGION

Black Muslims aim for unity in challenging time for Islam

  • Fatimah Farooq is shown, Tuesday, March 14, 2017 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Farooq counsels refugees from places like Iraq and Syria, who have been victims of trauma, torture or sex trafficking. Personally, she tries to help relatives from Sudan, some of whom have faced barriers resettling in the United States as her parents did right before she was born. In between, she is trying to navigate being black, Muslim and a daughter of immigrants.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

    Fatimah Farooq is shown, Tuesday, March 14, 2017 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Farooq counsels refugees from places like Iraq and Syria, who have been victims of trauma, torture or sex trafficking. Personally, she tries to help relatives from Sudan, some of whom have faced barriers resettling in the United States as her parents did right before she was born. In between, she is trying to navigate being black, Muslim and a daughter of immigrants.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)  (The Associated Press)

  • Fatimah Farooq is shown, Tuesday, March 14, 2017 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Farooq counsels refugees from places like Iraq and Syria, who have been victims of trauma, torture or sex trafficking. Personally, she tries to help relatives from Sudan, some of whom have faced barriers resettling in the United States as her parents did right before she was born. In between, she is trying to navigate being black, Muslim and a daughter of immigrants.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

    Fatimah Farooq is shown, Tuesday, March 14, 2017 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Farooq counsels refugees from places like Iraq and Syria, who have been victims of trauma, torture or sex trafficking. Personally, she tries to help relatives from Sudan, some of whom have faced barriers resettling in the United States as her parents did right before she was born. In between, she is trying to navigate being black, Muslim and a daughter of immigrants.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)  (The Associated Press)

Many Muslims are reeling from a U.S. presidential administration that's cracked down on immigrants, including through a travel ban that targets six Muslim-majority countries. But black American-born Muslims say they have been pushed to the edges of the conversations — even by those who share the same religion.

They say they often feel discrimination on multiple fronts: for being black, for being Muslim and for being black and Muslim among a population of immigrant Muslims. The identity issues have rippled into social media with Twitter's #BeingBlackAndMuslim and @BlkMuslimWisdom, formed in recent weeks to amplify their stories.

In response, activists say they're seizing the opportunity to unite Muslims of all backgrounds.