Pennsylvania

The Latest: Confession challenged in trooper barracks ambush

The Latest on a defense request to suppress the confession of barracks ambush suspect Eric Frein (all times local):

2:55 p.m.

A defense lawyer says a man charged in the 2014 ambush slaying of a Pennsylvania trooper clearly invoked his right to remain silent before going on to incriminate himself "dozens of times" in a police interview after his arrest.

William Ruzzo asked a judge Monday to throw out the videotaped confession of Eric Frein (freen). He says troopers got Frein to implicate himself even after he told them he didn't want to talk to them.

District Attorney Ray Tonkin says Frein was ambiguous about asserting his right to remain silent.

Frein could face a death sentence if he's convicted in the attack that killed Cpl. Bryon Dickson II and injured Trooper Alex Douglass. He led police on a 48-day manhunt in the Pocono Mountains before his capture by U.S. marshals.

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10:30 a.m.

A judge has heard testimony on whether he should throw out the videotaped confession of a man charged in the 2014 ambush slaying of a Pennsylvania trooper.

Attorneys for Eric Frein (freen) contend police violated his rights on the night of his arrest by continuing to interrogate him after he told them he didn't want to "answer questions about crimes." They also say police blocked an attorney hired by Frein's parents from seeing him.

Frein is accused of opening fire outside a state police barracks in the Poconos, killing Cpl. Bryon Dickson II and critically wounding a second trooper. Frein led police on a 48-day manhunt before his capture.

A judge watched portions of the tape Monday. He has yet to rule.

Opening statements in the trial will be held Tuesday.

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1 a.m.

Attorneys for a man charged in the 2014 ambush slaying of a Pennsylvania police trooper are asking a judge on the eve of his trial to throw out his videotaped confession.

Eric Frein (freen) is accused of opening fire outside a state police barracks in the Poconos, killing Cpl. Bryon Dickson II and critically wounding a second trooper. Frein led police on a 48-day manhunt before his capture.

Frein's lawyers contend police violated his rights on the night of his arrest by continuing to interrogate him after he told them he didn't want to "answer questions about crimes." Police have said Frein was informed of his right to remain silent but agreed to cooperate.

A judge is scheduled to hear arguments Monday on whether Frein's statements should be suppressed. Opening statements in the trial will be held Tuesday